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Returned servicemen from the Great War could look forward to government grants of pastoral freehold. West Australia's Willyabrup Valley was such a place, just a short walk from the balmy beaches of Indian Ocean, it offered the veterans excellent potential for agriculture. The fertile lands of Sussex Vale were originally established to animal husbandry by the discharged troopers, generations of livestock enriched the soils and it was astutely sown to vines in 1973. Fortuitously placed at the very heart of the Australian west's most illustrious estates, it continued to occupy the thoughts of neighbouring Howard Park's chief winemaker, until he acquired the.. A better block on hay shed hill»
Somewhere near the Seaview end of McLaren Vale's Chapel Hill Road, a perfunctory passerine perched her pincers astride a pair of power poles and saw herself alit. Down she went amongst the dry grown branches of an old Grenache vineyard, setting the valuable veterans ablaze. The scorched site eventually came to the attention of a winemaking trio, the Messrs Leske, Tynan & Cooke, Masters of Wine and a venerable vintner, all driven by a consuming passion to make greater Grenache. Thistledown vintage very small amounts of the most extraordinary Grenache. Beautifully detailed and conspicuously elegant, their floral bouquets and graceful finish emulate the aromatic.. Polly & the pyre to paradise»
Henry Best was a highly industrious merchant and butcher who serviced Ararat miners during the Victorian gold rush. He planted thirty hectares of vine along Concongella Creek in 1866 and constructed a commercial cellar wineworks which continue to process the most spectacular vintages until the present day. The heirloom plantings of Henry Best remain productive, as some of the most historically significant rootstock in the world. Home of the Jimmy Watson 2012 Trophy, Royal Sydney 2013 Australian Wine Of Year, James Halliday 2014 Wine of Year, Distinguished and Outstanding Langtons Classifications. Remarkable for a style that's all their own, chiselled, brooding.. Carn the concongella cabernet»
Beechworth attracts the most artisanal winemakers, the region's rich mineral soils and parched, undulating terrains, breed wines of vigorous flavour, crystalline textures and boney savoury tannins. The first parcel of Crown Land in the region was acquired by Isaac Phillips in 1857, he christened his estate Golden Ball and built a hotel named Honeymooners Inn, servicing miners on their way up the steep trails to the Beechworth goldfields. The old pub remains but the surrounding land has been turned over to viticulture, planted to vine in the nineteen naughties, it produces a quality of wine that's reserved for the nation's most exclusive winelists. Served by.. Small batches of beechworth's best»

Bleasdale Wise Old Tawny Port CONFIRM VINTAGE

Grenache Shiraz Frontignac Verdelho Langhorne Creek South Australia
Bleasdale was established in 1850, classified by the National Trust and listed on the State National Heritage Registers. Fully conversant with the soils, the microclimates and the cycle of flooding which nourishes the unique terroir of the estate's vineyards, fifth generation winemaker Michael Potts cultivates the old Grenache and Verdelho vines destined for inclusion into the Wise Old Tawny. A smooth rich Port wine full of rancio and nutty flavours obtained through a slow maturation over many years under small oak casks. It's all about the history and moreish Tawny rancio richness.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$149.50
Assembled from a reserve of barrel aged wines from various vintages, Wise Old Tawny is a mostly Grenache fortified wine with smaller components of Shiraz, Red Frontignac and Verdelho, in roughly equal measure. The historic cellars where the wine is aged were originally constructed with redgum members and limestone blocks. Today the cellar still houses a massive redgum lever press which fifth generation winemaker, Michael Potts uses to make his small batch wines. Though steeped in history, Bleasdale has installed the latest winemaking technology to retain the best qualities of matured reserve wines, whilst delivering to the connoisseur an authentic Fine Old Tawny of consistency and value. Alcohol 18.5%
Red nut brown colour. Appealing bouquets of plum and ginger, sticky figs and ripe date puddings, smokey peat and fine spirit. On the palate lie characters of treacle and walnut, marmalade, beef suet and orange rind, notes of unslated roast nuts and sweet black cherries, strawberry and hints of maple. The wine is deep and rich, the alcohol soothing and suitably attired, flavoursome and beautifully focused, the tannins whisper past with a sigh of relief at being unnoticed.
Bleasdale
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Bleasdale
Bleasdale is Australia's second oldest, still functioning family owned winery. Bleasdale's wines are the stuff of legend and receive accolades around the world every year

Established in 1850 by English migrant Frank Potts, the Bleasdale vineyards are situated on the fertile flood plains of the Bremer River which run parallel to Langhorne Creek. The area is a low rainfall, cool climate region which produces outstanding wines year after year. Ironically, it was Frank Potts abilities as a sailor that led him to Langhorne Creek to live the life of a landlubber. He saw the potential of the region when he explored it in the 1850s, convinced that the stands of tall red gums promised fertile soils and reliable water. Being a nautical man, it's not surprising that Frank Potts chose to plant a vineyard in a place that for a week or two occasionally becomes an inland sea. He planted his first vines in 1858 selling wine to Thomas Hardy, before expanding his holdings to 30 acres in the 1860s. Since Pott's founding efforts, Langhorne Creek's alluvial soils and favourably cool climate, nurtured by maritime breezes, has attracted many famous winemakers.

Bleasdale

Langhorne Creek experiences natural floods from the high rainfall that gushes out of the Adelaide Hills and heads towards the sea from time to time. It occurred to Frank that with the addition of floodgates across the river he could control the water for a short period and give his vines a deep soaking drink just before the parching Australian summer. Langhorne Creek receives an average annual rainfall of just 380mm per year and flood events provide enough moisture in the rich deep soil profile of the flood plain to carry vines in these areas through the dry summer months. The majority of the vast vineyard plantings use modern and efficient drip and sub-surface irrigation practices to maintain the water needs of the vines.

Bleasdale is today still owned and operated by the Potts family, the fifth generation of winemakers. They lead a dedicated winemaking and cellar team who are very proud of their work. When you've been around for six generations of winemaking you accumulate innate viticultural skills and an affinity to the environment. Access to water, coupled with cooling breezes from Lake Alexandrina reduce evening temperatures and provide mild even growing seasons, making Langhorne Creek the ideal wine growing region. Despite this, much of the Langhorne Creek's fruit went into multi-regional blends and wasn't acknowledged until the 1990s when a small group of long term family growers, including Bleasdale, started promoting pure Langhorne Creek wines.

Traditionally a red wine grape region best known for full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet blends, as well as elegant Shiraz, the region also produces exceptional white and fortified wines. Langhorne Creek is now the centre of a vibrant grape growing and winemaking community which regularly wins national and international awards.

Bleasdale

The historic Bleasdale cellars, constructed from red gum and limestone, have been classified by the National Trust and are listed on the State and National Heritage Registers. The ancient winery houses a massive red gum lever press which fifth generation winemaker, Michael Potts still uses once a year to make a small batch, limited release wine.

Whilst Bleasdale is steeped in yesterday's history it has been outfitted with the latest technology. Today's winery still abides by the family traditions, retaining the philosophy of producing honest, consistent and reliable wines. Watch for the cobwebs as you clamber down the old redgum ladder into the bowels of Bleasdale winery. Duck your head and enter the old domed cellar built in 1892 and gaze around the walls at French and American oak puncheons, hogsheads and barriques, brim full of Cabernet and Shiraz. They are all destined for Bleasdale's super premium Frank Potts and Generations flagships, but that's years away. For now each parcel of each variety is matured separately, with up to 200 different wines all expressing their own individuality based on microclimate and soil.

Wander on to the redgum tasting bench where in September every year you'll find the team murmuring as they taste and spit wine samples. This exhaustive three day examination of every parcel, aided by two independent judges, will create the script for each final blend to be assembled. The outcome is not just about art and romance. Local growers wait anxiously for this time of the year when they know how their fruit will be graded and whether they receive a bonus for quality, rather than tonnes produced. It's the way it should be, in the pursuit of quality.

Bleasdale