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Just a few kilometres north of Lowburn, near the windswept shores of frigid Lake Dunstan, atop the parched and laborious terroirs of Central Otago, a high country merino stud between the Amisfield and Parkburn streams was sown to vineyards two decades ago. Grazing country makes magnificent viticulture, the austere alluvial and glacial schist soils now yield the quality of Pinot Noir which has defined Central Otago as the world's most demonstrable marque in full bodied, intensely complex, yet beguilingly seamless Pinot Noir. The challenging terraces which spiral around the fractious knolls of Amisfield Vineyard, sire a sensational range of wines defined by.. Satiations from the nethermost regions»
Greg Melick embarked on the prodigal road to gambling and booze as a mere teenager, after winning the daily double at Werribee and spending the lot on good red wine. He ultimately returned to the straight and narrow, achieving the rank of ADF Major General, Senior Law Counsel, Master Wine Judge and Officer of Australia AO. Melick now grows his own, he remains besotted with les grands vignobles de Bourgogne, the illustrious Pinot Noir of Cote de Nuits and Cote de Beaune. There are few places in the world, more akin to the 1er Grand Cru style of Pinot Noir, than the temperate pastures along Tasmania's River Derwent. It was here in 2002, amongst the woodland.. Pressing matters in pinot noir»
Just three kilometres from Young along Murringo Road, planted to a brisk 500 metres above sea level, Grove Estate was originally sown to vines in 1886, by Croatian settlers who brought cuttings from their farms on the Dalmatian coast. Some of these ancient plantings, emigrated at a time when much of Europe was ruled by Hapsburg emperors, remain productive to this day. Newer blocks were gradually established around these priceless parcels, ostensibly with a view to supplying leading national brands. The quality of fruit became so conspicuous that Grove Estate sanctioned industry celebrities from Ravensworth and Clonakilla to begin bottling under their own.. Quiet consummations of grove estate»
Rolf Binder is one of the Barossa's quiet achieving superstars, recipient of the most conspicuous national accolades, Barossa Winemaker of Year and Best Small Producer, Best Barossa Shiraz Trophy and coveted listing in the illustrious Langtons Classification of Australian Wine. Binder's focus has always been on old vines fruit, in particular, the abstruse canon of early settler varietals which populated Barossa Valley during the 1840s. Wild bush vines Mataro, picked off patches at Tanunda along Langmeil Road, ancient growths of Grenache from Gomersal and Light Pass. Rolf's tour de force are eight superlative rows of Shiraz, established 1972 by the Binders.. Seven decades of tillage at tanunda»

Brokenwood Pinot Noir CONFIRM VINTAGE

Pinot Noir Beechworth Victoria
Attention to detail has always been at the centre of the Brokenwood ethos, in this case, an assemblage of three clones Pinot Noir, harvested off several individual blocks on the eminent Indigo Vineyard at Beechworth. Blessed by a confluence of oblique terrains, mineral soils and chilly climes, Beechworth represents the ideal home for the pastoral Pinot Noir. Structured, balanced and offering excellent weight of fruit, everything in the right place and in good order, splendid with the traditional accompaniement of duckling, steak tartare or salmon escalopes to suit.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$203.50
Keeping things labour intensive and maintaining attention to detail, are essential to retaining the integrity of Brokenwood. Retention of primary fruit character is the priority. Parcels of Beechworth Pinot Noir, with the inclusion of a portion whole bunches, are treated to a term of cold soak maceration. Upon completion of ferments, batches are filled to a selection of seasoned French oak barriques for a year's maturation.
Youthful purple colour. Great complexity to the bouquet, lifted red cherry fruit over earthy, savoury notes, seasoned by a touch of spiced oak sweetness. An exquisitely balanced palate, strawberries and framboise throughout, tomato leaf and thyme, supported by a length of ripe, pliant tannins before a lingering, fruit filled finish. Enjoy while young and fresh as a food friendly Pinot Noir.
Brokenwood
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Brokenwood
Established in 1970, Brokenwood Wines has evolved from a weekend venture for self-professed hobby winemakers into one of Australia's most reputable wine labels

Brokenwood was founded by a trio of Sydney-based solicitors, Tony Albert, John Beeston and James Halliday, who paid a then record price of $970 per acre for a 10-acre block in the foothills of the Brokenback Ranges. The original block - originally planned as a cricket ground for the local community was planted with Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz.

Brokenwood

The first vintage was picked in 1973. It was a labour of love for the partners, and the friends and families they conscripted to help, with the grapes being carried to the winery in buckets in the back seat of Len Evans' Bentley. Brokenwood's inaugural vintage yielded 75 dozen Shiraz - Cabernet. While none of the original partners claimed to know anything about viticulture, the wine received praise, and attracted a loyal following from its first vintage.

In 1975, a new winery was built to accommodate the growing production. The winery housed fermentation tanks and oak barrels, and, in dorm-style accommodation, the exhausted bodies of the many helpers who came to stay at Brokenwood, seduced by the promise of clean country air, fine food, wine and company in exchange for help on the vineyard. Visitors helped themselves to a taste of the very limited and eagerly sought after boutique wine made by Halliday and his band of weekend winemakers from a table standing in the shade of the first floor balcony.

Growth was steady until the boom of 1978, when six new partners joined, allowing the purchase of the next door Graveyard Vineyard. Designated as a cemetery by the local town planners, but never used as such, the block had been planted with Shiraz & Cabernet Sauvignon.

Brokenwood

The heavy clay soil resulted in vintages of low yield, but with extraordinary concentration of flavour in the berries, providing a distinctive wine style that is still evident in the Brokenwood red wines.

The Graveyard Vineyard created Brokenwood's flagship wine, the Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz, which is still sourced exclusively from this one vineyard. The Langtons Classification of Distinguished Australian Wine has it as the highest rated Hunter Valley red wine, in the Outstanding category. In the same year, Brokenwood sourced fruit from outside the Hunter Valley for the first time - Cabernet Sauvignon from Coonawarra - which was blended with Hunter fruit to make a premium red.

In 1982, the company extended its range to include white wines - notably the jewel of the Hunter Valley, Semillon. With this broadened scope, the partners decided to consolidate further growth by appointing a Chief Winemaker/Managing Director. Iain Riggs joined Brokenwood in 1982, introducing new winery equipment and facilities specifically for premium white wine production. Brokenwood was now capable of producing high quality white wine, which, since 1983, has been a significant part of its total production.

The multi-regional blend wines, such as the popular Cricket Pitch range, are sourced from premium regions throughout Australia to create a style that demonstrates balance, elegance and consistency. While the size of the company has grown, the operation remains deliberately labour intensive, being the only way of assuring the individuality of the wines.

Brokenwood