• Delivery
Wine clubWine clubWine clubWine club
  • Gift registry
  • Wishlist
  • FAQs
Grown to the frigid climes of Central Otago, the vines at Prophet's Rock were established 1999 to the most auspicious sites in the nether regions around the ancient goldfields of Bendigo Creek. Challenging aspects with breathtaking views of Cromwell Basin and Pisa Ranges, these are places defined by their fortuitous soils and favourable climes, tiny parcels of vine capable of just a few hundred cases each vintage, picked for their confluence of growing conditions and husbanded by a devout cadre. The winemaking is decidedly French, small vessels and wild yeasts, followed by an extended term on sedimentary lees for opulence. Invigorated by the warmth of alluvial pebbles and infused by the minerality of quartz schists, the opportune vines yield a small range of.. Bounty of bendigo goldfields»
Returning to his home along the Nagambie Lakes after the completion of service during World War II, Eric Purbrick discovered a cache of wine, hidden circa 1876 under the family estate cellars. Though pale in colour, it was sound and drinkable after seven decades. The promise of long lived red wine inspired Purbrick to establish new plantings at Chateau Tahbilk in 1949, today they are some of Victoria's oldest productive Cabernet Sauvignon vines. Having barely scraped through the ravages of phyloxera and a period of disrepute, the fortunes of Tahbilk were turned around by Purbrick who was the first to market Australian wine under its varietal name. Tahbilk proudly hosts the largest, single holding of Marsanne on the planet. Tahbilk's original rows of Shiraz are.. Phyloxera, ancient cellars & seriously old vines»
After hearing tall tales of the Victorian klondike, he jumped ship and made his way to the Castlemaine goldfields. Black Jack mined no fortune but he found his fame as the only American mariner to still be savoured alongside have claimed the eminent M.Chapoutier Trophy for Best Shiraz at the prestigious Le Concours des Vinson on no fewer than three occasions... Found berth in the australian colonies during the goldrush of the 1850s»

Giant Steps Yarra Valley Pinot Noir CONFIRM VINTAGE

Pinot Noir Yarra Valley Victoria
Giant Steps
1 - 12 of 23
1 2 next»
1 - 12 of 23
1 2 next»
Giant Steps
The Giant Steps winemakers are directing their winemaking towards single vineyards in locations that can support varietals of distinction

Great wine is made in the vineyard. At its best it is like a fingerprint, inextricably linking the personality and mood of the land from which it has sprung.

Giant Steps

The Giant Steps vineyard is on 115 acres of rocky gravel over clay, 50 km east of Melbourne, on the north facing slopes of the Warramate ranges overlooking the Yarra Valley. The vineyard covers two ridges that rise from 400 to 1100 feet above the valley floor.

Giant Steps seek to grow fruit and ultimately make wine that is less overt and obvious than is encouraged in Australia. The winemakers look for structure and length rather than breadth; finesse rather than largesse and above all, fruit rather than artefact.

Giant Steps is owned and operated by a small team - Phil, Allison and Harry Sexton.

The story starts 2600 km and 23 years ago when Phil established the Devils Lair vineyard in Margaret River. He was joined there in 1990 by Allison, an American biochemist. 1995 proved an excellent year; son Harry was born.

Giant Steps

In life, not many people get the chance to do something again; differently, with the benefit of hindsight. While they loved the wines they were producing, they dreamed of creating a small, specialised cool climate vineyard together, as a family. From scratch.

And, in 1997 they took the giant step; sold Devils Lair and crossed Australia to a dream site on the slopes of Victoria's Yarra Valley, alongside several benchmark cool climate vineyards that they had long admired.

After an immense amount of work and many years they have turned a horse stud into a vineyard. The winemakers wanted hands on and they got it.

The Sexton family winemakers are quietly confident that the Yarra Valley can produce Bordeaux varietals with savoury structure, finesse, clarity and textbook fruit purity; without the cedary, geranium/capsicum characters we so often see in this country out of cooler or fast ripening regions.

Giant Steps