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Constructed during early settlement by a supervisor of colonial convicts, at the very epicentre of the market gardens which serviced Hobart, Clarence House is a heritage listed manor which remains largely unaltered since the 1830s. It passed through several hands before being acquired by the Kilpatricks in 1993, who answered the call of Bacchus and established the grounds to vine. There are now sixteen hectares of viticulture, several significant Burgundy clones of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, with smaller plantings of Sauvignon and Pinot Blanc, Merlot, Cabernet and Tempranillo. What's most unique about the Clarence House vineyards are the soils and topography, a number of northeast slopes which catch the early sun yet shade the vines from afternoon heat. A natural endowment of rich Jurassic soils which impart wonderful.. Heirlooms of a hobart homestead»
Graeme Melton and a mate were travelling across South Australia in 1973, their EH Holden was in dire need of maintenance and Graeme took up casual work at a passing winery. The site supervisor was Peter Lehmann and young Graeme had his epiphany on the road to Barossa Valley. Lehmann suggested that Graeme change his name to Charlie and take the pilgrimmage to Vallee Rhone. Charlie became prepossessed with the culture of old vines Grenache, Shiraz and Mourverdre. He returned to the Barossa, at a time when old vineyard fruit was made into flagon Port and growers were destroying their historic sites in return for government grants. Charlie emabarked on a crusade to conserve and restore the ancient vines, establishing his cellars at Tanunda along Krondorf Road. He has since retained the most precious parcels, once destined.. Melton makes a mean mourvedre»
Xavier Bizot can make wine anywhere he pleases, he is a Bollinger and grew up amongst the Vignobles Superieurs of Champagne. Bizot has chosen to make wine alongside Brian Croser's family, from grapes harvested off three magnificent sites, on two paradoxically varied terrains. Planted to the salubrious Terra rosa soils atop an invaluable archeological dig at Wrattonbully, rich with the undisturbed fossils of ancient Cenozoic sea animals, Crayeres Vineyard was established right across the road from Tapanappa's illustrious Whalebone. The weather here is astonishingly similar to Bordeaux and makes an awesome Cabernet Franc. Xavier Bizot and Lucy Croser are also fortunate to take their pick of properties in Adelaide Hills. To wit, Charles (Chilly) Hargrave's distinguished old vines at Summerton and a highly opportune slice.. The twin tales of terre a terre»

Kay Brothers Basket Pressed Shiraz CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz McLaren Vale South Australia
Everything made at the Kay Brother wineworks gets a passage through the estate's famous eighty year old basket press, a gentle treatment which achieves exquisite palate softness. The unique expression of vintage is preserved each year by a delicate balance in the mix of new and prior use oak barrels. One of McLaren Vale's first vineyards, the Amery property was initially sown to seven acres of vine in the 1860s. The brothers Kay acquired the land in 1891, introducing plantings from Hardy's Tintara, four precious acres which remain productive to this day.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$173.50
The winemaking practices at Kay Brothers have remained largely unchanged since establishment in the nineteenth century. An ancient basket press, painted bright red in colour, takes pride of place. Arriving somewhat late in the history of Amery Vineyards, the earliest vintages were passed through a hand crusher and then by a horse which traversed round a capstan. A collation of Shiraz parcels are harvested off Kay Brother's estate, much of it very old vine material. Fruit is vinified in good old fashioned open fermenters, hand plunged and transferred via traditional, 1928 vintage basket press, into a selection of seasoned and new, American and European oak barrels for fourteen months maturation.
Dark purple in colour. Rich plum and roast beetroot, blackberries and tobacco leaf dominate the nose with savoury dried spices adding complexity. Medium to full bodied, the lively fruits continue on the palate with briary berries upfront and fuller flavours of roast gravy on the finish. Supported by a tight acidity and grainy tannins, all underscored by a hint of wood smoke that sees the palate finishing focused and long.
Kay Brothers
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