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Sandro Mosele is one of Victoria's most accomplished vignerons, his celebrated editions of Kooyong and Port Phillip estates are amongst the most cherished renderings of Burgundy styled Pinot Noir in the nation. Mosele has applied his art to a precious parcel of fruit, picked off a single, modest block of vine, grown to the fully fertile soils of a lamb and beef stud, on the brisk, maritime blown coastals of Gippsland South. This is not Pinot for profit, Walkerville represents an aesthetic appreciation of fruit from the farmer, invigorated by the blessings of providence and consecrations of local livestock. A cornucopia of comely characters, forcemeats and.. The grazier's garden of gippsland»
There are but two winemakers who can lay claim to a staggering four Jimmy Watson Trophy victories. Wolf Blass was the man behind the label. John Glaetzer was the man behind Wolf Blass. While working for Wolf, Glaetzer was moonlighting on his own brand, applying the same extravagance of technique to the pick of Langhorne Creek fruit. Perfection in the form of black bramble fruit, muscular yet affable tannins, all framed by the luxury of ebony oak. Aspirants of the great Black Blass Label fables of 1974, 1975 and 1976, are privately advised to avail themselves of John's Blend, Cabernet or Shiraz. Crafted from the same parcels, in the same way, by the same hands,.. Timeless mystique of langhorne creek»
Lindsay McCall's enthusiasm for great wine began in the 1970s, he established his first Mornington plantings in 1985 on the site of a derelict orchard at Red Hill along Paringa Road. From day one, McCall focused on exactingly managing the soils and the vines, after completing his day job as local school teacher. His affinity for the land and astonishing feel for winemaking produced monumental vintages of Pinot Noir, which propelled the exquisite range of Paringa Estate wines to international renown. McCall works closely with Mornington's finest vignerons to nurture better standards of viticulture and deliver finer vintages with each harvest. Limited yields of.. Exquisite editions by the master of mornington»
Medical practitioners are conspicuously over representedas proprietors, within the pantheon of Australia's most artisanal boutique vineyards and baronial winemaking estates.Is it really all about the quest for a healthy mind and healthy body, or rather something more visceral and indulgent that our physicians are practising?The chemists at Claymore have chosen to formulate their range of elixirs according to a taxonomy of remedial refrains.Santana's Black Magic Woman conjures up edifications of a brooding Cabernet Sauvignon. The Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon whets the palate for an opaque, cryptic Shiraz.A canon of unchained melodies, all from the fruit of.. Completely in concert with clare»

Torbreck Steading Marsanne Viognier Roussanne CONFIRM VINTAGE

Marsanne Viognier Roussanne Barossa South Australia
Inspired by the lusciously rich, mineral scented dry whites of La Vallée Rhône, Torbreck have assembled the essential cépage of Marsanne, Viognier and Roussanne, sourced entirely from the distinguished Descendant Vineyard at Roennfeldt Road in Marananga. Five rows each of superior vine, set aside every year for the construct of full bodied whites to rival the classics of the old world. A seamless experience in silken texture, to accompany anything seafood, west coast marron or moreton bay bug, brewed mussels or deftly prepared abalone.
Available by the dozen
Case of 12
$551.00
All grapes are picked by hand, separately handled according to variety and gently pressed to individual vats for a natural cold settling. After a day of rest, the Roussanne component is racked to fermenters, Marsanne and Viognier are filled to a selection of seasoned French oak barriques, for a rich barrel vinification in the traditional Rhone Valley way. Each parcel is treated to a slow indigenous fermentation, followed by a term of seven months maturation on fine lees prior to assemblage.
Bright yellow hues. Fragrant aromas of acacia flowers roasted nuts and buttered citrus, neatly balanced by underlying hints of bees wax and mineral, fino and chalk. The ripe, fleshy barrel fermented Viognier and Marsanne contribute extraordinary richness to the palate, Roussanne brings flintyness and mineral, savouryness and chiselled, austere personality.
Torbreck
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Torbreck
Low yielding, old and dry grown Barossa Valley vineyards are the cornerstone of Torbreck Vintners

Torbreck founder David Powell was immersed in the study of Economics at Adelaide University, when an uncle introduced him to wine. Young Dave realized that grapes could be more intriguing than numbers. He began spending more and more of his spare time in the Barossa Valley and during the winters, he availed himself of the opportunity to venture overseas to work harvests in California and Italy. He travelled throughout the famous wine regions of Europe and even spent time in Scotland as a lumberjack. This experience was instrumental in illuminating the unique attributes of the Barossa, at a time when others felt its heritage was past the sell by date.

Torbreck

Finding work at Rockford, Powell became steeped in the traditional culture of the Barossa as the idea of owning his own winery began to take shape. David was saddened by the vinous devastation caused by the mid 1980s government sponsored ‘Vine Pull’ scheme. He became convinced that a market existed for old vine wines as influenced by the classic Rhône styles. Lacking deep pockets (but inspired nonetheless), he set about approaching local landowners concerning their neglected properties.

Powell began to discover and clean up a few sections of dry grown old vines and was able to secure a contract for the supply of grapes from a run down but ancient Shiraz vineyard. He managed to raise enough money to share farm the vineyard, a practice which involves paying the owner a percentage of the market rate for his grapes in return for totally managing the property. Dave nurtured these old, lifeless and overgrown vineyards in his spare time. Near lifeless, he brought them back to health and was rewarded with small parcels of fruit which he made into wine.

Bringing the old practice of share farming back to the Barossa subsequently secured for him a regular supply of fruit from the best Shiraz, Grenache, and Mataro vineyards, including a few hectares of what are thought to be among the oldest grapevines on the planet. In return for his equity of toil and sweat, Powell’s efforts were rewarded with a few parcels of dry grown fruit, and he turned these wages into the first bottles of Torbreck.

Torbreck

As the first vintages lay in barrel, Dave thought back to his experiences overseas and realized that the growers of the Barossa Valley had overlooked the suitability of the French white Rhône varieties. Powell purchased 30 acres of land in Marananga in 1994 for the purpose of planting Marsanne, Roussanne, and Viognier. Shiraz was included in the mix in what is now known as the Descendant Vineyard, also the site of the new Torbreck winery.

In 1995 Dave crushed three tonnes of grapes and fermented them into wine in a shed on his 12-hectare Marananga property. He named his wine Torbreck after the forest in Scotland where he worked as lumberjack. Other acquisitions (included a one hundred year old vineyard that had been previously share farmed) soon followed, and Torbreck continues to follow the path of sourcing the best fruit possible from its own vineyards and those of select growers. It can be said that the Torbreck portfolio offers the best of both worlds, old and new. Powell is a passionate believer in the Barossa Valley and its viticultural heritage. Dave loves the intense, rich, Rhone-like flavours that come from old vines. His approach to grapegrowing and winemaking melds the region’s terroir with its traditional winemaking practises. In so doing he has achieved a style that fuses his love for the Barossa with his admiration for the valleys of the Rhône.

In July 2002 the historic Hillside property was acquired by Torbreck. Situated in Lyndoch, it is one of the original Barossa properties. Vast and picturesque it contains some magnificent old and ancient vineyards that will further the source of premium quality fruit. The Hillside property contains a wonderful native ecosystem that supports a myriad of flora and fauna which Powell intends to turn it into a nature reserve. An original settlers hut has been lovingly restored as the winery cellar door and provides a personal touch with some Barossa warmth. A new winery and administration facility was completed on land acquired from a next door neighbour. Complete control of all aspects of production have seen a new benchmark of wine quality established by Torbreck in the Barossa.

Torbreck