• Delivery
Wine clubWine clubWine clubWine club
  • Gift registry
  • Wishlist
  • FAQs
Longview are one of the most highly awarded wineries in Adelaide Hills, inducted into the South Australia Tourism Hall of Fame for their stately homesteads and the sublime excellence of their vintages. A place of pristine viticulture and breathtaking beauty, where native gums flourish with wild abandon amongst the closely husbanded plantings. It's all captured within the fruit of the wines themselves, the purity of varietal expression, the elegance of tannins and seamless textures, Longview are all about encouraging the grace of a truly resplendent harvest, to retain its eloquence from vineyard to bottling... Natives amongst the vines»
Established 1908, Redman's Coonawarra are still made by the Redman brothers from fruit grown to the original family parcels. The tradition began 1901 when Bill Redman, at the tender age of fourteen, made the journey to take up an apprenticeship at the John Riddoch wineworks and to labour amongst Coonawarra's founding vineyards. Bill Redman's earliest vintages were sold off to other companies but it was not until 1952 that the Redman family released their own wines under the moniker Rouge Homme. Redman was finally branded under its own label in 1966, it remains one of the most enduring marques in Coonawarra. Husbanded by the 4th generation, parcels from the.. The velvet virtue of old coonawarra vines»
Jim Barry was a pioneer of the Australian wine industry, the first academically qualified winemaker to take up Clare Valley viticulture in 1949. He had an uncanny intuition for good land and established some of the most illustrious vineyards on the continent. Jim Barry is also a patriarch of the Coonawarra, in pursuit of the perfect terroir for Cabernet Sauvignon, he planted vines on the ancient Penola Cricket Oval, preserving the original pavilion for posterity. Jim Barry endures as one of the nation's most distinguished brands, renowned throughout the world of wine for decades of the most remarkable vintages, an evolving range of superior vineyard editions,.. Salient statements from superior sites»
Stephen C. Pannell is one of Australia's most decorated winemakers, Jimmy Watson and twice Max Schubert Trophy winner, London International Winemaker of Year and Chairman National Wine Show. Pannell grew up amongst the illustrious plantings of his parents vineyards at Moss Wood, he established the profoundly artisanal Picardy of Pemberton and found time in between tours of duty at Wirra Wirra, Tintara and BRL Hardy, to do vintage in Burgundy, at the illustrious Mouton Rothschild and amongst the grand old vines of Barolo. Whatever the brand, regardless of vintage, S.C. Pannell's extraordinary wines are all distinct for their remarkable splendour, beguiling.. Peerless value by our nation's finest»

Voyager Estate Chenin Blanc CONFIRM VINTAGE

Chenin Blanc Margaret River Western Australia
Some of the Chenin Blanc vines at Voyager Estate date back to the property's first planting in 1978. The fully mature blocks are treated to exacting viticultural practices, consistently producing some of the most superior quality fruit to be found anywhere in Margaret River. The team at Voyager aim to produce an easy drinking, aromatic Chenin Blanc that's not overly complex, in a sophisticated style which can retain and display the classic vibrant ripe varietal fruit flavours, complemented by a small amount of residual sugar.
Available by the dozen
Case of 12
$323.00
The application of simple vineyard philosophies is more important to making a great Chenin Blanc than introducing new techniques. Basic vineyard principles which remain universal are a good terroir and minimal intervention. The management of vines at Voyager Estate focuses on canopy maintenance, low bud numbers and small bunches. Clonal selection means finding the perfect match for each soil. Chenin Blanc is sourced from three estate blocks, grapes are immediately pressed, juices are cold settled, racked and inoculated with yeast QA23. After two to three weeks vinification at 15ËšC, batches are held on yeast lees for a month and regularly stirred to enhance textural richness. Alcohol 13.5%
Light straw colour. Aromas of tropical fruits, grassy herbaceousness with fresh notes of citrus and red apples. Rich tropical fruit flavours of lychee and paw paw with hints of citrus and red apple create a fruit salad styled palate. Voyager displays lovely fruit weight and texture with a hint of sweetness balanced by fresh natural acidity.
Voyager Estate
1 - 12 of 22
1 2 next»
1 - 12 of 22
1 2 next»
Voyager Estate
Voyager Estate is located in the premium wine producing region of Margaret River

Voyager Estate began life as Freycinet Estate, its first vines being planted in 1978. When it became Voyager Estate in 1991, the first move was to expand the original 44 hectares by buying three adjoining properties, bringing the total area to 300 hectares. Over the next few years a program of extensive modernization and improvement was undertaken. Taking pride of place is a magnificent cellar sales building, constructed in the enduring South African Cape Dutch style of architecture. The choice of this handsome and functional style of architecture reminds visitors that the first vines planted in Western Australia in 1829 were introduced from South Africa. The expansive gardens are now maturing and transforming Voyager Estate into a place of singular tranquility and beauty.

Voyager Estate

Voyager Estate's oldest vines date back to 1978, just over 10 years after vines were first planted in the area. When current owner Michael Wright took over the property in 1991, he set out to expand it and develop a visitor destination that would be a showcase for the region. He also set out to ensure that, above all else, the quality of wine being made at Voyager Estate would always be the best that nature, expertise and pure hard work could provide.

Voyager Estate owner, Michael Wright is a third generation member of a family business that started with his grandfather in 1900. Michael’s father, Peter Wright, played a major role in the discovery and promotion of WA’s substantial iron ore industry and was, along with Lang Hancock, a founding member of the Hancock & Wright group. While the family is best known for its mining involvement, it also enjoys interests in agricultural, transport and publishing to name a few.

In the opinion of Voyager Estate Viticulturist, Steve James "There are a number of differences in viticultural techniques around the world, but the basic vineyard principles common to the best producers were terroir, minimal intervention and vine management." Voyager Estate follows the same path, with a minimal or no-input policy in terms of fertiliser, water and chemicals, and are employing more and more organic practices. Maximum vine management in terms of canopy maintenance is employed, aiming for low bud numbers and small bunches per vine for premium fruit quality. Clonal selection is also an area of increased attention, trying to match the best clones to the soil.

Voyager Estate

Whilst there will always be experimentation with new technologies, experience in both the Old World and the New has shown that the deepest expression of the vineyard is reliant on the basics. Adapting the traditional vineyard philosophies of the ancient winemaking world, is at the very heart of what makes Voyager Estate the quality that it is. According to Winemaker, Cliff Royle, Voyager Estate’s winemaking philosophy is simply to make the best wines we possibly can. Traditional methods are applied and the latest technology is utilised.

The winemaking process, however, begins in the vineyard. To ensure the best possible wines are produced, the winemakers work very closely with the viticultural team during the ripening period and harvest. On the whole, the best wines come from minimal winemaking intervention and allowing the fruit to speak for itself. "We make wines from the classic grape varieties that are suited to the Margaret River region, and we put as much effort into making a lighter-style wine such as Sauvignon Blanc Semillon as we do our Chardonnay," Cliff says.

In Cliff’s view, it is essential to respect the varietal characteristics of the fruit and so, when it comes to the use of oak, he is very careful not to overdo it. "The best fruit in the world can be ruined by heavy-handed or uncomplimentary oak usage. Careful oak integration is so important – we want to enhance the fruit, not overpower or spoil it." There is one final key component to good winemaking – people. On this point, Cliff is quite clear: "Have good staff, train them well and look after them". And we agree with him. After all, he is Winestate Magazine’s 2002/03 Australian Winemaker of the Year

Voyager Estate