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The family Hentschke have been Barossa farming since 1842, they know from good soils and settle on nothing but the finest land. Keith Hentschke chose a special site along Greenock Creek, at the intersection of Gerald Roberts and Jenke Roads, near the ancient winegrowing hamlet of Seppeltsfield to plant vines in the early 1990s. They now yield vintages of the most amazing intensity, saturated with the essence of grand Barossa Shiraz, an international wine industry favourite and a sagacious selection this.. Savour a sip of seppeltsfield»
Boutique winemaking affords great advantages, every vine can be uniquely husbanded, quality control is maximised, each barrel can be individually sampled and assembled into the perfect cuvee. Engineering types are innately suited to such viticulture. Colin Best embarked upon his sabbatical to the great vineyards of Burgundy's Cote d'Or. He returned to plant Pinot Noir on a craggy half hectare near Lobethal in the Adelaide Hills. An ancient masonry wool mill was outfitted for winemaking and Leabrook Estate was born. This is an aesthetic range of meticulously crafted, limited vintages, fashioned for the aficianado of bespoke, small batch, little vineyard wines... The lobethal libations of leabrook»
Much of the prized harvests from the Hugo family property are destined for Australia's most esteemed brands, the best parcels however, are reserved and released under the Hugo label. Consistency of quality from vintage to vintage is the objective, making wine from the pick of estate grown fruit makes it a reality. A precious component of low cropped, dry grown old vines fruit, greatly enhances the depth of flavour and overall complexity. A Shiraz of opulence and finesse, opaque and textural, in the style of McLaren Vale's most outstanding vintages, Gold Medals Winner Royal Adelaide & Australian Small Winemakers Show, have your Hugo alongside standing rib, at a very value.. Headline harvests of hugo»
Coriole
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Coriole
Siituated in the hills north of the McLaren Vale township in an area known as the Seaview sub region, the Coriole winemaking operation was aquired and re-established by the Lloyd Family during the sixties

Coriole's old house and barn were constructed in about 1860. The slate roof of the old house, and its immense slate slab floors are typical of early houses of the district. Coriole was first owned by an English company, managed by Geoffrey Kay, a distant relative of the the Kays of nearby Amery Winery. Coriole's old shiraz vines were planted in 1919, when the district was experiencing a strong surge in export growth of its burgundy style wines to England and increasing wine sales interstate.

Coriole

The paths of Coriole and Seaview crossed in 1935, when the Kays bought Hope Farm. The Mannings had sold Hope Farm to the Cravens in 1891, and during World War I, the Craven's son was killed in action. In his grief, his father lost his mind, and the property was managed by his wife until 1935. In that year, she sold it to the Kays of Coriole, who ran both properties until 1948, when they sold to Edward Chaffey, and it became known as Seaview. In 1962, Coriole was sold to John Snell,who was of Swiss descent. Snell established Australia's first organic winery, Chateau Ban Sante. He farmed the original shiraz vines without chemical inputs, and built a small winery, which remains the nucleus of Coriole's modern winery today.

Hugh and Molly Lloyd acquired the property in 1968 and the first vintage release under the Coriole label was 1970. Hugh Lloyd (1914 - 1994) was a general practitioner in Adelaide's southern suburbs. The son of a Methodist minister, he had been raised in a teetotal Adelaide family, but had become very interested in wine in the 1950s. Molly Lloyd (nee Parsons 1914 - 1994) also had an enthusiasm for farming, as a member of the Parsons family who grew almonds and grapes and other fruit on the rich horticultural lands along the Sturt River in what is now suburban Oaklands Park in Adelaide.

Together, Hugh and Molly laid strong foundations for Coriole. Hugh Lloyd embarked on a development plan for the winery and vineyard, using the old shiraz vines to establish the reputation of the business, while equipping the winery with more modern technology. He was helped in the early years by winemaker Graeme Stevens, with Coriole winning the coveted Wine Bushing King and Queen title in both 1974 and 1975 for making the best shiraz wines in the McLaren Vale district.

Coriole

The 1980's were a relative quite time in the Australian wine industry. It was during this period that Coriole pioneered the development of Italian varieties by planting Sangiovese, which became the only Sangiovese produced in the country for many years. Also during this period Coriole was one of the first companies to release an extra virgin olive oil and start producing aged sweet vinegar - released each year after five years maturation.

As the 1990s developed, interest in wine boomed. This was reinforced by the increasing evidence of the health benefits of red wine. During the 1990's the winery expanded its markets both in Australia and overseas. Winemakers at Coriole have included Robert Paul, Stephen Hall and since 1999 Grant Harrison. Paul Lloyd,the youngest sibling of the Lloyd family, became business manager in 1993. Today, Coriole employs eleven full time staff, and crushes more than 500 tonnes a year.

The winemaking at Coriole is preceded by thorough assessment of wine styles and the wine plans for each vintage. This process involves many members of staff, including managing director Mark Lloyd. The aim is to maintain Coriole’s tradition of producing premium full-bodied red wines from McLaren Vale, focusing on Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon. However, we are also enthusiastic about the ambitious plans for Sangiovese at the winery and its potential to produce such a contrasting style to Shiraz.

Coriole carries its tendency for innovation and experimentation into winemaking as well. Often this involves the evaluation of different vineyards. However, each vintage is an opportunity to experiment with new techniques and evaluate their role in achieving the Coriole wine style. Most commonly very traditional techniques are used. Red wines are mainly open fermented in stainless steel or old wax lined concrete tanks. Ferments are hand plunged 2 and 3 times a day with warm but controlled ferments. New oak is used in some red wines but usually only after prior experimental use has established the appropriate role of the oak. Many wines are such as Sangiovese and Redstone are specifically matured in older oak to gain maturity but with mimimum contribution of oak extract in the wine. The ageing potential of these wines is not compromised in any way.

Coriole