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Balgownie are one of our nation's great small vineyards, pioneers of the reprise in Bendigo viticulture, with the foresight to establish vines in 1969, the first local plantings in over eighty years. Grown to terrains very near the tailings of Victoria's original gold rush, the auspicious Balgownie vines yield discreet yet exquisite harvests of the most edifying and undervalued Victorian vintages. A bespoke favourite amongst enthusiasts of the old school style in elegant and finely boned Aussie Shiraz, Balgownie represent the essential accompaniment to meaty eggplant inspired recipes, or a princely roast of lamb, the best of.. Balgownie begets the best of bendigo»
A living legend and bespoke savant of the Australian wine industry, Geoff Merrill began his career in 1973 at Seppelt & Son, before completing tours of duty at Thomas Hardy and Chateau Reynella. Geoff acquired the historic Reynella wineworks in 1985 and has continued to craft many of McLaren Vale's most memorable vintages ever since. Mr Merrill has claimed countless industry accolades and many of our nation's most prestigious awards, including the hotly contested VISY Great Shiraz Challenge and the illustrious Jimmy Watson Trophy. Merrill offers a range of artisanal, limited release wines, of timely age, extravagant oak and sound value... The advanced age & luxury oak of mclaren vale's quiet achiever»
Coonawarra cattle graziers since 1906, the Reschke family turned some of their land over to viticulture in the 1980s. Such was the quality of Reschke fruit, that it became an essential inclusion for some of Wynn's most memorable vintages and a number of national icon wines. Reschke now keep the pick of crop for their own label, the most princely harvests of Coonawarra Cabernet, Merlot and Shiraz, characterised by their defined regional eloquence and ingratiating palate weight. The fruit of vines, planted to iron red terra rosa soil and nourished by the fertile plenitude from generations of grazing cattle, for every ardent enthusiast of born and bred, baronnial Coonawarra marques... Reschke red, born & bred»
Coriole
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Coriole
Siituated in the hills north of the McLaren Vale township in an area known as the Seaview sub region, the Coriole winemaking operation was aquired and re-established by the Lloyd Family during the sixties

Coriole's old house and barn were constructed in about 1860. The slate roof of the old house, and its immense slate slab floors are typical of early houses of the district. Coriole was first owned by an English company, managed by Geoffrey Kay, a distant relative of the the Kays of nearby Amery Winery. Coriole's old shiraz vines were planted in 1919, when the district was experiencing a strong surge in export growth of its burgundy style wines to England and increasing wine sales interstate.

Coriole

The paths of Coriole and Seaview crossed in 1935, when the Kays bought Hope Farm. The Mannings had sold Hope Farm to the Cravens in 1891, and during World War I, the Craven's son was killed in action. In his grief, his father lost his mind, and the property was managed by his wife until 1935. In that year, she sold it to the Kays of Coriole, who ran both properties until 1948, when they sold to Edward Chaffey, and it became known as Seaview. In 1962, Coriole was sold to John Snell,who was of Swiss descent. Snell established Australia's first organic winery, Chateau Ban Sante. He farmed the original shiraz vines without chemical inputs, and built a small winery, which remains the nucleus of Coriole's modern winery today.

Hugh and Molly Lloyd acquired the property in 1968 and the first vintage release under the Coriole label was 1970. Hugh Lloyd (1914 - 1994) was a general practitioner in Adelaide's southern suburbs. The son of a Methodist minister, he had been raised in a teetotal Adelaide family, but had become very interested in wine in the 1950s. Molly Lloyd (nee Parsons 1914 - 1994) also had an enthusiasm for farming, as a member of the Parsons family who grew almonds and grapes and other fruit on the rich horticultural lands along the Sturt River in what is now suburban Oaklands Park in Adelaide.

Together, Hugh and Molly laid strong foundations for Coriole. Hugh Lloyd embarked on a development plan for the winery and vineyard, using the old shiraz vines to establish the reputation of the business, while equipping the winery with more modern technology. He was helped in the early years by winemaker Graeme Stevens, with Coriole winning the coveted Wine Bushing King and Queen title in both 1974 and 1975 for making the best shiraz wines in the McLaren Vale district.

Coriole

The 1980's were a relative quite time in the Australian wine industry. It was during this period that Coriole pioneered the development of Italian varieties by planting Sangiovese, which became the only Sangiovese produced in the country for many years. Also during this period Coriole was one of the first companies to release an extra virgin olive oil and start producing aged sweet vinegar - released each year after five years maturation.

As the 1990s developed, interest in wine boomed. This was reinforced by the increasing evidence of the health benefits of red wine. During the 1990's the winery expanded its markets both in Australia and overseas. Winemakers at Coriole have included Robert Paul, Stephen Hall and since 1999 Grant Harrison. Paul Lloyd,the youngest sibling of the Lloyd family, became business manager in 1993. Today, Coriole employs eleven full time staff, and crushes more than 500 tonnes a year.

The winemaking at Coriole is preceded by thorough assessment of wine styles and the wine plans for each vintage. This process involves many members of staff, including managing director Mark Lloyd. The aim is to maintain Coriole’s tradition of producing premium full-bodied red wines from McLaren Vale, focusing on Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon. However, we are also enthusiastic about the ambitious plans for Sangiovese at the winery and its potential to produce such a contrasting style to Shiraz.

Coriole carries its tendency for innovation and experimentation into winemaking as well. Often this involves the evaluation of different vineyards. However, each vintage is an opportunity to experiment with new techniques and evaluate their role in achieving the Coriole wine style. Most commonly very traditional techniques are used. Red wines are mainly open fermented in stainless steel or old wax lined concrete tanks. Ferments are hand plunged 2 and 3 times a day with warm but controlled ferments. New oak is used in some red wines but usually only after prior experimental use has established the appropriate role of the oak. Many wines are such as Sangiovese and Redstone are specifically matured in older oak to gain maturity but with mimimum contribution of oak extract in the wine. The ageing potential of these wines is not compromised in any way.

Coriole