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Ken Helm A.M. received the Order of Australia for his work with Riesling, for his contribution to the Australian wine industry, for his support of cool climate wine producers and service to the Canberra community. Helm placed the Canberra region firmly on the map for world class wines after his inaugural 1977 release won significant international accolades. Ken's flagship wines are Riesling and Cabernet, he retains strong ties with eminent wine makers around the globe. Trips to the vineyards and wineries of Mosel, the Rhine valley and Bordeaux provide new inspiration and contribute to the development of his Canberra wines. In 2000 Ken instigated the Canberra.. Meet one of our nation's most peer respected winemakers»
Josef Chromy OAM escaped from war torn Czechoslovakia as a penniless 19 year old in 1950, he fled across minefields, evading soldiers and killer dogs, ultimately finding a new home in the lucky country. Chromy has been a long standing principal in the Tasmanian food and wine industry, he established Tasmania's leading brands, including Bay of Fires, Jansz, Heemskerk and Tamar Ridge. At 76 years young, he launched his namesake label, planting one of the apple isle's most stately vineyards and gazetting Tasmania's most compellingly stylish range of wines. Chromy's sensational vintages are as conspicuous for the uniqueness of their character as they are for their.. Tasty treats from the apple isle»
There were two scrub covered parcels of land, just outside Pokolbin village along McDonalds Road, that local council had long set aside for use as cricket ground and cemetery. Both were ultimately auctioned off to the highest bidders and sown to vine. A third undeveloped site became the subject of a long running feud among the new and old neighbours. Dodgy invoices between the rivals were exchanged and the division of firewood became a further cause of contention. A truce was eventually called by the two protagonists, Brokenwood and Hungerford Hill, for the sake of healthy viticulture. The nascent blocks achieved international renown as the eminent Cricket.. Sociable soils make for healthy vine»
Just three kilometres from Young along Murringo Road, planted to a brisk 500 metres above sea level, Grove Estate was originally sown to vines in 1886, by Croatian settlers who brought cuttings from their farms on the Dalmatian coast. Some of these ancient plantings, emigrated at a time when much of Europe was ruled by Hapsburg emperors, remain productive to this day. Newer blocks were gradually established around these priceless parcels, ostensibly with a view to supplying leading national brands. The quality of fruit became so conspicuous that Grove Estate sanctioned industry celebrities from Ravensworth and Clonakilla to begin bottling under their own.. Quiet consummations of grove estate»

Bleasdale Powder Monkey Shiraz CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz Langhorne Creek South Australia
Powder monkeys were rookies during the great age of sail, their job in times of ship to ship combat was to fill the ancient open muzzle cannons with gun powder and shot. A perilous internship aboard the decks on a man of war, in reference to Frank Potts term of seamanship in the Royal Navy. Potts established vines along the banks of Bremer River in the 1850s, he named his first block Powder Monkey, it remains the source of Langhorne Creek's most eminent Shiraz, a stately wine of splendid concentration and remarkable seamlessness.
Bleasdale are one of Australia's most enduring family enterprises, their historic limestone cellars are National Trust and National Heritage listed. The ancient wineworks house a massive red gum lever press, which fifth generation Michael Potts employs every year to make a small batch, limited release wine. Behind the Bleasdale cellars is a single block of vine which is called upon at vintage, to release precious parcels of hand picked Shiraz. Grapes are destemmed into open fermenters, pumped over four times daily throughout vinification, drained and pressed for an extended maceration on skins, before racking to a high proportion of new French oak puncheons and hogsheads for a year's maturation.
Deep crimson colour. An intense fruit nose, the accent is on dense blackberry, licorice and bitter chocolate notes. Tapenade and black olive flavours, ripe plum and milled tricolour pepper characters, supported by a veneer of splendid French oak and fine, savoury tannins running through the length of palate. A match to the finest gourmandise, suckling pig and pink lamb.
Bleasdale
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Bleasdale
Bleasdale is Australia's second oldest, still functioning family owned winery. Bleasdale's wines are the stuff of legend and receive accolades around the world every year

Established in 1850 by English migrant Frank Potts, the Bleasdale vineyards are situated on the fertile flood plains of the Bremer River which run parallel to Langhorne Creek. The area is a low rainfall, cool climate region which produces outstanding wines year after year. Ironically, it was Frank Potts abilities as a sailor that led him to Langhorne Creek to live the life of a landlubber. He saw the potential of the region when he explored it in the 1850s, convinced that the stands of tall red gums promised fertile soils and reliable water. Being a nautical man, it's not surprising that Frank Potts chose to plant a vineyard in a place that for a week or two occasionally becomes an inland sea. He planted his first vines in 1858 selling wine to Thomas Hardy, before expanding his holdings to 30 acres in the 1860s. Since Pott's founding efforts, Langhorne Creek's alluvial soils and favourably cool climate, nurtured by maritime breezes, has attracted many famous winemakers.

Bleasdale

Langhorne Creek experiences natural floods from the high rainfall that gushes out of the Adelaide Hills and heads towards the sea from time to time. It occurred to Frank that with the addition of floodgates across the river he could control the water for a short period and give his vines a deep soaking drink just before the parching Australian summer. Langhorne Creek receives an average annual rainfall of just 380mm per year and flood events provide enough moisture in the rich deep soil profile of the flood plain to carry vines in these areas through the dry summer months. The majority of the vast vineyard plantings use modern and efficient drip and sub-surface irrigation practices to maintain the water needs of the vines.

Bleasdale is today still owned and operated by the Potts family, the fifth generation of winemakers. They lead a dedicated winemaking and cellar team who are very proud of their work. When you've been around for six generations of winemaking you accumulate innate viticultural skills and an affinity to the environment. Access to water, coupled with cooling breezes from Lake Alexandrina reduce evening temperatures and provide mild even growing seasons, making Langhorne Creek the ideal wine growing region. Despite this, much of the Langhorne Creek's fruit went into multi-regional blends and wasn't acknowledged until the 1990s when a small group of long term family growers, including Bleasdale, started promoting pure Langhorne Creek wines.

Traditionally a red wine grape region best known for full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet blends, as well as elegant Shiraz, the region also produces exceptional white and fortified wines. Langhorne Creek is now the centre of a vibrant grape growing and winemaking community which regularly wins national and international awards.

Bleasdale

The historic Bleasdale cellars, constructed from red gum and limestone, have been classified by the National Trust and are listed on the State and National Heritage Registers. The ancient winery houses a massive red gum lever press which fifth generation winemaker, Michael Potts still uses once a year to make a small batch, limited release wine.

Whilst Bleasdale is steeped in yesterday's history it has been outfitted with the latest technology. Today's winery still abides by the family traditions, retaining the philosophy of producing honest, consistent and reliable wines. Watch for the cobwebs as you clamber down the old redgum ladder into the bowels of Bleasdale winery. Duck your head and enter the old domed cellar built in 1892 and gaze around the walls at French and American oak puncheons, hogsheads and barriques, brim full of Cabernet and Shiraz. They are all destined for Bleasdale's super premium Frank Potts and Generations flagships, but that's years away. For now each parcel of each variety is matured separately, with up to 200 different wines all expressing their own individuality based on microclimate and soil.

Wander on to the redgum tasting bench where in September every year you'll find the team murmuring as they taste and spit wine samples. This exhaustive three day examination of every parcel, aided by two independent judges, will create the script for each final blend to be assembled. The outcome is not just about art and romance. Local growers wait anxiously for this time of the year when they know how their fruit will be graded and whether they receive a bonus for quality, rather than tonnes produced. It's the way it should be, in the pursuit of quality.

Bleasdale