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The First Colonists to arrive in South Australia were brought to Kangaroo Island aboard HMS Buffalo in 1836. Sharing the journey was a veteran of the Royal Navy who had served aboard Lord Nelson's flagship HMS Victory. Frank Potts was an accomplished sailor and carpenter, he built many of the young colony's structures and trading vessels. Six generations later, the Potts family's precious plantings of Malbec have been a key component in many of the nation's most memorable and invaluable vintages for decades. A varietal that performs magnificently on the silty flood plains of Langhorne Creek, Bleasdale's pure Malbec bottlings are a profound statement about the.. Making the most magnificent malbec»
Rolf Binder is one of the Barossa's quiet achieving superstars, recipient of the most conspicuous national accolades, Barossa Winemaker of Year and Best Small Producer, Best Barossa Shiraz Trophy and coveted listing in the illustrious Langtons Classification of Australian Wine. Binder's focus has always been on old vines fruit, in particular, the abstruse canon of early settler varietals which populated Barossa Valley during the 1840s. Wild bush vines Mataro, picked off patches at Tanunda along Langmeil Road, ancient growths of Grenache from Gomersal and Light Pass. Rolf's tour de force are eight superlative rows of Shiraz, established 1972 by the Binders.. Seven decades of tillage at tanunda»
Established 1976, Clairault are one of the pioneering estates on Margaret River. A tastefully limited range, from elite vineyards within the very dress circle of prestigious wineries at the heart of Margaret River's most illustrious precincts, Wilyabrup, Yallingup and Karridale. These are the dearest winegrowing terroirs in the Australian west, a place of auspicious soils and stimulating climes, the motherlode of environmentals which yield the most august vintages on the continent. The team at Clairault take a decidedly pastoral approach, biodynamically grown and environmentally sound, a sanctuary to native flora and fauna, their vineyards are managed to a.. The kindly cabernet of clairault»
Samuel Smith migrated from Dorset England to Angaston in the colony of South Australia circa 1847, he took up work as a gardener with George Fife Angas, the virtual founder of the colony. In 1849, Smith bought thirty acres and planted vines by moonlight, the first ever vintages of Yalumba. One of his most enduring legacies were some unique clones of Shiraz, which were ultimately sown to the illustrious Mount Edelstone vineyard in 1912. Angas's great grandchild Ron Angas acquired cuttings from the Edelstone site and migrated the precious plantings to his pastures at Hutton Vale. The land remains in family hands, a graze for flocks of some highly fortunate.. The return of rootstock to garden of eden»

Kaesler Old Bastard Shiraz CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz Barossa South Australia
A single vineyard Shiraz from fruit grown to the estate's 1893 block, hand pruned and hand picked, yielding less than two tonne per acre. When Kaesler first purchased the property, it was in a derelict state and certain to die if measures to revive the site were not expedited. Many years of over cropping and neglect had taken its toll. A previous regime of irrigation with increasingly salty bore water was slowly poisoning the soil. A thousand kilos of Old Bastard's fruit gives about 680 litres of wine or about 900 bottles, single vineyard expression at its most extreme.
Each
$180.99
Dozen
$2171.00
The Kaesler family sprung from Silesian pioneers who migrated to the Barossa in the 1840s. The ancient vines on the 1893 block have deep roots, permitting a greater uptake of minerals, heightening the complexity of the Old Bastard. A greener farming approach has yielded a wine which is enormously hard to interpret when young. A French technique known as eleve-en-chene is employed throughout the vinification, assisting the skilled vignerons who are at a loss to explain what they can't see and don't understand. Old Bastard is matured in the Kaesler's underground cellar for eighteen months in a selection of choice Burgundian oak barrels, bottled a la natural, without any fining or filtration.
Deep red colour. Bright and welcoming nose, an eye of fruit that's hard to unwind, a bowl of red fruits, ink with a streak of fresh rhubarb, oak leaves a scent of Arabic spice market. Bright structured acid, soft milk chocolate, a nice glow of fruits emerge, pomegranate and rhubarb prevail. The finish is of superfine talcum textured fruit and oak tannins.
Kaesler
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