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Planted to a rocky hillock just east of township Clare, Mocandunda is a collaboration of three well seasoned vignerons, the Messrs Heinrich, Ackland and Faulkner. Heinrich grows fruit for a number of the nation's leading labels, Faulkner is one of Clare Valley's most accomplished agronomists, Ackland established the illustrious Mount Horrock Wines. Mocandunda was years in the making, one of the highest altitude terroirs in all Clare Valley, the extended autumns and dry grown vines, encourage a exceptional ripening of grapes, intense with varietal characters, magnificently balanced between natural fruit sugars, acidity and tannin. Mocandunda sell the lion's.. The craggy copse on valley clare»
Giovanni Tait mastered the family tradition of coopering wine barrels before migrating to Australia in 1957. He took up work in the Barossa and ultimately settled in for a lengthy engagement at B Seppelts and Sons, where he played a significant role in the vinification and maturation of some of the most memorable vintages in Australian viticulture. Tait's boys grew up to be winemakers, their attention to detail and close relationship with the Barossa's finest growers have earned the highest accolades from the international wine industry press. Generously proportioned yet exquisitely balanced, famously praised, perennially by savant Robert Parker as the most.. Bespoke parcels of old vineyard fruit»
Excruciatingly low yields, a ruthless hand sorting of fruit, ferments in new oak barrels and twenty months maturation, Bowen Estate are one of Coonawarra's most prestigious marques, maintaining a standard of excellence which merits inclusion into the highly prestigious Langtons Classification of Australian Wine. Essential for every enthusiast of stellar quality Cabernet Sauvignon, brought within easy reach this week at the down to earth.. Excellent langtons classification of australian wine»
There were two scrub covered parcels of land, just outside Pokolbin village along McDonalds Road, that local council had long set aside for use as cricket ground and cemetery. Both were ultimately auctioned off to the highest bidders and sown to vine. A third undeveloped site became the subject of a long running feud among the new and old neighbours. Dodgy invoices between the rivals were exchanged and the division of firewood became a further cause of contention. A truce was eventually called by the two protagonists, Brokenwood and Hungerford Hill, for the sake of healthy viticulture. The nascent blocks achieved international renown as the eminent Cricket.. Sociable soils make for healthy vine»

Ata Rangi Sauvignon Blanc CONFIRM VINTAGE

Sauvignon Blanc Wellington Martinborough New Zealand
Ata Rangi are the product of love for the land and passion for the vine. The dry windy climate consistently delivers low yields with high concentrations of flavour in the grapes. Obsessive attention to detail throughout the growing season ensures the fruit comes in at optimum flavour and balance. The care taken extends to harvesting the warmer side of individual rows and going back a few days later for the cooler side. A term of age on yeast less enhances palate weight and complexity, lovely tropical notes of guava and papaya contend for attention.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$209.50
From the Lismore and Waiora, Walnut Ridge, Hau Ariki Marae and Southdown Estate vineyards. Sites are all very similar, shallow silt loam over deep, free raining alluvial gravels, rainfall is very low. The naturally low yields, older vines, small canopies and judicious, labour intensive, hand picking of the entire crop, make an essential contribution to the uniquely Martinborough style of Sauvignon Blanc.Grapes are all hand picked, sorted and crushed, a portion is vinified in contact with skins and held for two months, drawing out more complex flavours, which works with the natural acidity to add a refreshing backbone. A third of the wine is fermented in neutral oak barrels for texture and richness.
Light straw colour. Notes of elderflower, lemon/ lime, tropical papaya and hints of fresh fennel are defining features. A full, creamy palate entry, lovely weight and a long and focused finish, a restraint and elegance that's all class. Aiming for a complex, satisfying, food friendly style, a small portion is fermented in older barrels to enhance mid palate weight and texture.
Ata Rangi
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Ata Rangi
Clive Paton planted the originally bare, stony 12-acre home paddock at the edge of the Martinborough village in 1980, one of a handful of people who pioneered grape growing in Martinborough

Ata Rangi means new beginning or dawn sky. The site was a barren 5-hectare paddock when Clive Paton bought it in 1980. He was one of a handful of winemaking pioneers in Martinborough, then a forgotten rural settlement, who were attracted to the area by three key features - the localised, free-draining shingle terrace some 20 metres deep, the lowest rainfall records of anywhere in the North Island, and the proximity to the capital city of Wellington, just an hour away. Clive, who'd farmed in the area, knew the land well. He chose mainly red varieties - Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah - and set out in pursuit of world class wines. Pinot Noir's potential shone from the start - the early wines widely appreciated for their texture and for their pure fruit expression of the variety.

Ata Rangi

The early days were tough with no income, trees or shelter belts (the Wairarapa is renowned for its relentless, drying nor-westers) and little experience. The first winemakers persevered, sharing knowledge and ideas, as well as equipment and winery space. Clive grew pumpkins and garlic between the rows, carting them to the markets in Wellington.

Clive called Auckland winemaker Malcolm Abel and volunteered to work a vintage. He knew that Malcolm was also chasing premium pinot noir, and the two soon became close friends. Malcolm gave Clive some promising pinot cuttings, the offspring of a single vine cutting allegedly taken by a traveller from Burgundy’s finest estate, Domaine de la Romanée-Conti. The illegal cutting had been intercepted and confiscated at Auckland airport, where Malcolm, coincidentally, was working as a customs officer in the mid seventies.

To this day, the Abel Clone, or Gumboot Clone (legend has it the nicked cutting was secreted inside a Kiwi gumboot!) remains at the heart of Ata Rangi Pinot Noir. Every Pinot enthusiast adores the texture, and length of palate it delivers. Its tannins are substantial, yet are incredibly silky and fine. From wthin the Ata Rangi site, it brings dark cherry, and a brooding, savoury feel.

Ata Rangi

Clive's faith in the area has paid off immensely. Ata Rangi Pinot Noirs have three times won the coveted Bouchard-Finlayson Trophy for Best Pinot Noir at the International Wine and Spirit Competition in London. This international recognition came after a decade of gold medal and trophy successes in Australasian wine competitions. Today the wines enjoy an enviable international reputation, with listings in many of the finest restaurants of the world. As Bob Campbell MW notes "It's true - Ata Rangi has the Midas touch with all of its wines."

Ata Rangi and the family team have gradually expanded since those early days. Clive's sister Alison, who'd been working in the wine trade in London, purchased 2 hectares adjoining the original block in 1982. Particular effort goes into achieving balanced vines, delivering consistently ripe, quality bunches. Hand leaf plucking over the summer ensures open canopies. Yields are very low, typically 1 to 2 T/acre (3 T/hectare). This is due to the usually cool, very windy spring weather which affects fruit set and also to the lean, stony soils which are low in vigour and fertility. All grapes are hand-picked. Many of the vines are now 27 years old, a factor in the wines ascending quality, as is this hands-on emphasis in the vineyard. Sustainability and soil health are our goals - read more about this on the Environment page.

Around 12,000 cases are produced from the 30 hectares of vineyards supplying fruit to the winery. Almost half is exported, mainly to Australia, the EU, USA and Japan. The winery shop welcomes visitors all year around. Hours are 1pm to 3pm midweek, and Noon to 4pm weekends and holidays. Today, Martinborough is thriving. The charming, leafy wine village - with its cluster of restaurants, cafes and interesting shops centred around a park-like Square - is a popular destination for wine and food-lovers or for those simply seeking a retreat from city life.

Ata Rangi