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Graeme Melton and a mate were travelling across South Australia in 1973, their EH Holden was in dire need of maintenance and Graeme took up casual work at a passing winery. The site supervisor was Peter Lehmann and young Graeme had his epiphany on the road to Barossa Valley. Lehmann suggested that Graeme change his name to Charlie and take the pilgrimmage to Vallee Rhone. Charlie became prepossessed with the culture of old vines Grenache, Shiraz and Mourverdre. He returned to the Barossa, at a time when old vineyard fruit was made into flagon Port and growers were destroying their historic sites in return for government grants. Charlie emabarked on a crusade.. Melton makes a mean mourvedre»
William James Maxwell was an architectural sculptor who migrated from Scotland to Australia in 1875. He built a mock castle and established a family vineyard just outside Adelaide, which he named Woodlands Park. His son planted vines in nearby McLaren Vale and his grandson served a term as winemaker for Hardy Wines at the historic Tintara wineworks. William Maxwell's progeny remain in McLaren Vale, producing the southern hemisphere's most successful brands of Honey Mead, as well as vintages of the most extraordinary value in McLaren Vale Shiraz. But what does Maxwell taste like? Gentleman James Halliday describes Maxwell as robust, picking the eyes out of.. Made of mature vine mclaren vale »
Airline pilots make surprisingly good wine. Their appreciation of the sciences, a respect for the weather and a bird's eye view of the land, all invaluable to the winemaker's art. John Ellis would take every opportune weekend away from his regular New York Paris route, to pursue a passion for viticulture. He planted the first commercial Cabernet Merlot vines in the Hamptons and found time between trans atlantic flights to work vintages amongst the Grand Cru vineyards of La Bourgogne. Ellis ultimately made the great lifelong sea change in favour of our land downunder. He settled on a farmstead outside Leongatha, amongst the slow ripening pastures of Gippsland.. Placing pinot amongst the pastures»
Constructed during early settlement by a supervisor of colonial convicts, at the very epicentre of the market gardens which serviced Hobart, Clarence House is a heritage listed manor which remains largely unaltered since the 1830s. It passed through several hands before being acquired by the Kilpatricks in 1993, who answered the call of Bacchus and established the grounds to vine. There are now sixteen hectares of viticulture, several significant Burgundy clones of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, with smaller plantings of Sauvignon and Pinot Blanc, Merlot, Cabernet and Tempranillo. What's most unique about the Clarence House vineyards are the soils and topography,.. Heirlooms of a hobart homestead»

De Bortoli Vinoque Chardonnay CONFIRM VINTAGE

Chardonnay Yarra Valley Victoria
A collation of Chardonnay parcels harvested off choice Yarra Valley sites, including the auspicious estate properties at Tarrawarra and Dixons Creek. De Bortoli operate the most well established Chardonnay vineyards in the region, her viticultural team have had decades of practice at training their vines to yield the finest harvests. Long on the palate with all the vital Yarra Valley stonefruit flavours, Vinoque is enhanced by old world vinification techniques to become nutty and complex, immensely satisfying and long on the palate.
Available by the dozen
Case of 12
$281.00
The Vinoque range makes use of single vineyard fruit and classic regional styles, it affords the dedicated De Bortoli winemaking team a chance to experiment with artisanal vinification techniques and to employ a selection of varietal clones, mainly in development stage. Chardonnay can be a style of myriad interpretations, the Yarra Valley grows its own unique quality of fruit and Chardonnay is well suited to the region's cooler clime, undulating vineyards. State of the art viticulture and good old fashioned hand picking is followed by a course of whole bunch pressing and fermentations in seasoned French oak, to achieve a generously proportioned wine that's beautifully balanced and quite fine in structure.
Light straw hue. Stonefruits and mealy nose, apple fruit characters, notes of savoury, kernel and meal. Dry on the palate, minerally and edgy, crisp fruit flavours supported by savoury acidity and a measure of finesse. There aren't many better matches in the world of gastronomy than Vinoque and pan fried Dory fillets.
De Bortoli
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