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Jim Barry was a pioneer of the Australian wine industry, the first academically qualified winemaker to take up Clare Valley viticulture in 1949. He had an uncanny intuition for good land and established some of the most illustrious vineyards on the continent. Jim Barry is also a patriarch of the Coonawarra, in pursuit of the perfect terroir for Cabernet Sauvignon, he planted vines on the ancient Penola Cricket Oval, preserving the original pavilion for posterity. Jim Barry endures as one of the nation's most distinguished brands, renowned throughout the world of wine for decades of the most remarkable vintages, an evolving range of superior vineyard editions,.. Salient statements from superior sites»
Gary and Nick Farr are father and son, they make wine together but aren't afraid to go head to head when their opinions differ. Nick grew up amongst some of the world's most sacred vineyards, he knows about the land and found a magnificent little site, barely east of Lake Colac. Irrewarra is the vigneron's shangri-la, prepared for viticulture by generations of grazing and eons of the sobering south sea breezes, which stimulate vines to yield meagre harvests of parched little grapes, sleek of tannin and rich in flavour. Vintaged in excruciatingly limited lots, there are fully two styles of Irrewarra on offer, a grapefruit and oyster shell Chardonnay, a Pinot.. It's irrewarra by farr»
The Australian winemaking industry is grateful to Leontine O'Shea, instrumental in the establishment of Mount Pleasant wines, she sent her son Maurice to France for an education in viticulture right at the outbreak of World War I, gifting him his first Hunter Valley vineyard in 1921. Mount Pleasant are now custodians of some grand old sites, a canon of small, elite blocks of vine that yield a precious range of icon wines, which represent peerless value and readily disappear before release of the following vintage... The legacy of grand old hunter valley vineyards»
Boutique winemaking affords great advantages, every vine can be uniquely husbanded, quality control is maximised, each barrel can be individually sampled and assembled into the perfect cuvee. Engineering types are innately suited to such viticulture. Colin Best embarked upon his sabbatical to the great vineyards of Burgundy's Cote d'Or. He returned to plant Pinot Noir on a craggy half hectare near Lobethal in the Adelaide Hills. An ancient masonry wool mill was outfitted for winemaking and Leabrook Estate was born. This is an aesthetic range of meticulously crafted, limited vintages, fashioned for the aficianado of bespoke, small batch, little vineyard wines... The lobethal libations of leabrook»

Voyager Estate Sauvignon Blanc Semillon CONFIRM VINTAGE

Sauvignon Blanc Semillon Margaret River Western Australia
Voyager are meticulous in everything they do, from varietal and clonal selection to vineyard management and the winemaking process. They can call on harvests of estate grown fruit which are second to none, to be assembled into the definitive style of Margaret River white. Sauvignon Blanc Clone 1 contributes crunchy lifted tropical fruit, Semillon adds healthy citrus, structure and palate weight. A vibrant west coast wine of elegance and engaging complexity, offering exquisite balance and a measure of regional charm.
Available by the dozen
Case of 12
$299.00
Voyager Estate's philosophy is simply to make the best wines possible. Traditional vinification techniques as well as the latest technologies are employed. Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc are harvested throughout the chill of night, each parcel is destemmed and pressed to fermenters for settling and clarification, each batch is racked and innoculated with a mix of X5, QA23 and UOA Maxithiol yeast cultures for two to three weeks of vinification. A part of the Semillon is treated to ferments in new tightly grain French oak barriques, followed by a course of maturation and lees stirring battonage for two months. Upon completion, components are assembled, stabilised and filtered for bottling.
Pale straw green hue. Aromas of tropical fruits with citrus pith, hints of white nectarine and talc. Vibrant with rich fruit flavours of citrus, fleshy stonefruits and tropical notes. A small component of barrel fermentation offers additional complexity and texture to the palate, finishing with a clean, crisp natural acidity. The fruit is fine and pure, the tropical flavours are upfront and bold.
Voyager Estate
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Voyager Estate
Voyager Estate is located in the premium wine producing region of Margaret River

Voyager Estate began life as Freycinet Estate, its first vines being planted in 1978. When it became Voyager Estate in 1991, the first move was to expand the original 44 hectares by buying three adjoining properties, bringing the total area to 300 hectares. Over the next few years a program of extensive modernization and improvement was undertaken. Taking pride of place is a magnificent cellar sales building, constructed in the enduring South African Cape Dutch style of architecture. The choice of this handsome and functional style of architecture reminds visitors that the first vines planted in Western Australia in 1829 were introduced from South Africa. The expansive gardens are now maturing and transforming Voyager Estate into a place of singular tranquility and beauty.

Voyager Estate

Voyager Estate's oldest vines date back to 1978, just over 10 years after vines were first planted in the area. When current owner Michael Wright took over the property in 1991, he set out to expand it and develop a visitor destination that would be a showcase for the region. He also set out to ensure that, above all else, the quality of wine being made at Voyager Estate would always be the best that nature, expertise and pure hard work could provide.

Voyager Estate owner, Michael Wright is a third generation member of a family business that started with his grandfather in 1900. Michael’s father, Peter Wright, played a major role in the discovery and promotion of WA’s substantial iron ore industry and was, along with Lang Hancock, a founding member of the Hancock & Wright group. While the family is best known for its mining involvement, it also enjoys interests in agricultural, transport and publishing to name a few.

In the opinion of Voyager Estate Viticulturist, Steve James "There are a number of differences in viticultural techniques around the world, but the basic vineyard principles common to the best producers were terroir, minimal intervention and vine management." Voyager Estate follows the same path, with a minimal or no-input policy in terms of fertiliser, water and chemicals, and are employing more and more organic practices. Maximum vine management in terms of canopy maintenance is employed, aiming for low bud numbers and small bunches per vine for premium fruit quality. Clonal selection is also an area of increased attention, trying to match the best clones to the soil.

Voyager Estate

Whilst there will always be experimentation with new technologies, experience in both the Old World and the New has shown that the deepest expression of the vineyard is reliant on the basics. Adapting the traditional vineyard philosophies of the ancient winemaking world, is at the very heart of what makes Voyager Estate the quality that it is. According to Winemaker, Cliff Royle, Voyager Estate’s winemaking philosophy is simply to make the best wines we possibly can. Traditional methods are applied and the latest technology is utilised.

The winemaking process, however, begins in the vineyard. To ensure the best possible wines are produced, the winemakers work very closely with the viticultural team during the ripening period and harvest. On the whole, the best wines come from minimal winemaking intervention and allowing the fruit to speak for itself. "We make wines from the classic grape varieties that are suited to the Margaret River region, and we put as much effort into making a lighter-style wine such as Sauvignon Blanc Semillon as we do our Chardonnay," Cliff says.

In Cliff’s view, it is essential to respect the varietal characteristics of the fruit and so, when it comes to the use of oak, he is very careful not to overdo it. "The best fruit in the world can be ruined by heavy-handed or uncomplimentary oak usage. Careful oak integration is so important – we want to enhance the fruit, not overpower or spoil it." There is one final key component to good winemaking – people. On this point, Cliff is quite clear: "Have good staff, train them well and look after them". And we agree with him. After all, he is Winestate Magazine’s 2002/03 Australian Winemaker of the Year

Voyager Estate