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The story of Langmeil begins with early Barossa settlement, planted to Shiraz by Christian Auricht in the 1840s, the estate vineyards were restored by the Lindner and Bitter families during the 1990s. Some of Herr Auricht's original plantings are still in production, three and a half priceless acres of gnarled, dry grown vines which provided the cuttings for much of Langmeil's refurbished heirloom parcels. A princely range of old, to very old single vineyard wines, delineated by the eloquence of each unique site, defined by the provenance of history and pioneer folklore. Saved from the ravages of time by the hand of providence and generations of dedicated.. The legacy landscapes of langmeil»
Returning to his home along the Nagambie Lakes after the completion of service during World War II, Eric Purbrick discovered a cache of wine, hidden circa 1876 under the family estate cellars. Though pale in colour, it was sound and drinkable after seven decades. The promise of long lived red wine inspired Purbrick to establish new plantings at Chateau Tahbilk in 1949, today they are some of Victoria's oldest productive Cabernet Sauvignon vines. Having barely scraped through the ravages of phyloxera and a period of disrepute, the fortunes of Tahbilk were turned around by Purbrick who was the first to market Australian wine under its varietal name. Tahbilk.. Phyloxera, ancient cellars & seriously old vines»
Some precious old blocks of ancient vine Grenache still remain after a government sponsored program to cull unproductive vineyards during the 1980s. Yielding excruciatingly small harvests of the most characterful fruit, these wizzened old veterans deliver small batch vintages which are evocative of the old world classics from Cotes du Rhone. The enduring Wirra Wirra were established 1894, their eclectic range belies the splendour of small parcels which are separately handled and bottled for exclusive release. The Absconder draws fruit from vines planted a century ago, it merits a breathing and decant, an articulation about the sublime excellence of old vine.. The compelling case for old vines grenache»
Samuel Smith migrated from Dorset England to Angaston in the colony of South Australia circa 1847, he took up work as a gardener with George Fife Angas, the virtual founder of the colony. In 1849, Smith bought thirty acres and planted vines by moonlight, the first ever vintages of Yalumba. One of his most enduring legacies were some unique clones of Shiraz, which were ultimately sown to the illustrious Mount Edelstone vineyard in 1912. Angas's great grandchild Ron Angas acquired cuttings from the Edelstone site and migrated the precious plantings to his pastures at Hutton Vale. The land remains in family hands, a graze for flocks of some highly fortunate.. The return of rootstock to garden of eden»

Charles Melton Kirche Shiraz Cabernet CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz Cabernet Sauvignon Barossa South Australia
A collation of choice parcels Shiraz from the Krondorf Village districts in Barossa. All grapes are dry grown and great emphasis is placed on the quality of fruit. Yields are extremely low, often only one or two tonne per acre. Parcels are vinified and assembled to contruct the most complete wine, in terms of balance between pure fruit flavours and earthy/ gamey qualities. A style which has a kiss of sweet oak, allowing the rich fragrance and flavours of old dry grown vines to remain at the fore, a Shiraz of intense flavours and richness by a Barossa master.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$227.50
Blocks of vine are picked in different lots to provide a full range of flavours. Parcels are treated to the full Charles Melton melange of techniques, whole bunch fermentation along with destemmed but uncrushed fruit. Cap management techniques include pigeage and hand plunging, as well as daily pumpovers throughout a week of vinification. Batches are filled to a mix of French and American oak barriques for completion of ferments, at a range of alcohols between 12.0% and 17.0%, fortuitously not too much quantity at either extreme, delivering a fascinating palate from which to assemble. An extended course of two years maturation on gross lees achieves a Barossa Shiraz of outstanding weight and complexity.
Lovely deep dark colour. Intense black fruits with a little smoky oak influence showing through. Very lifted nose with a faint camphor/ methanol note but not intrusive. An array of plum and blackberrry flavours seasoned by a twist of the pepper mill, a long spicy palate showing cedar oak and savoury chocolate, finishing with firm, rounded tannins. The weight of fruit is there, the elegance shines through.
Charles Melton
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