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Graeme Melton and a mate were travelling across South Australia in 1973, their EH Holden was in dire need of maintenance and Graeme took up casual work at a passing winery. The site supervisor was Peter Lehmann and young Graeme had his epiphany on the road to Barossa Valley. Lehmann suggested that Graeme change his name to Charlie and take the pilgrimmage to Vallee Rhone. Charlie became prepossessed with the culture of old vines Grenache, Shiraz and Mourverdre. He returned to the Barossa, at a time when old vineyard fruit was made into flagon Port and growers were destroying their historic sites in return for government grants. Charlie emabarked on a crusade to conserve and restore the ancient vines, establishing his cellars at Tanunda along Krondorf Road. He has since retained the most precious parcels, once destined for the logger's axe, they are now the genesis of fruit for the distinguished Barossa brand known as Charles.. Melton makes a mean mourvedre»
William James Maxwell was an architectural sculptor who migrated from Scotland to Australia in 1875. He built a mock castle and established a family vineyard just outside Adelaide, which he named Woodlands Park. His son planted vines in nearby McLaren Vale and his grandson served a term as winemaker for Hardy Wines at the historic Tintara wineworks. William Maxwell's progeny remain in McLaren Vale, producing the southern hemisphere's most successful brands of Honey Mead, as well as vintages of the most extraordinary value in McLaren Vale Shiraz. But what does Maxwell taste like? Gentleman James Halliday describes Maxwell as robust, picking the eyes out of McLaren Vale shiraz; licorice, dark chocolate, savoury firm, ripe tannins, blackberry, positive oak the icing on the cake. Terrific value. Oh yes, he suggests that it should be enjoyed by.. Made of mature vine mclaren vale »

Nautilus Marlborough Chardonnay CONFIRM VINTAGE

Chardonnay Marlborough New Zealand
One of New Zealand's most consistent Chardonnay, a label that will not disappoint, Nautilus has received great recognition at international competitions. Whole bunches are treated to an indigenous fermentation in a mix of seasoned and new French oak barriques, followed by a course of lees battonage for richness. A highly demanding viticultural focus, combined with the best of old and new world winemaking techniques, translates into a wine of balance and poise, as mesmerisingly aesthetic as the spiral on a nautilus shell.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$221.50
Parcels of clone 15 Chardonnay from the Renwick block and Korohi Vineyard on Pauls Road, are vinified alongside harvests of Dijon clone 95, grown by Jim and Debbie Greer on their Rapaura Road property. These sites are stony and free draining, giving naturally low yields and fantastic depth of flavour. All blocks are hand picked to a schedule determined by full ripeness without excessive sugars, whole bunch pressed and wild yeast fermented in French oak barriques. A regimen of lees stirring post ferment adds textural richness.
Pale straw in colour. A lifted aroma of tropical fruit and melon supported by toasty oak. On the palate are grapefruit/ citrus flavours integrated with nutty/ biscuit characters derived from indigenous fermentation and lees stirring. Nautilus has a tight mineral structure in its youth and develops a creamy texture as it matures.
Nautilus
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