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Kaesler WOMS Shiraz Cabernet CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz Cabernet Sauvignon Barossa South Australia
Kaesler own and operate thirty seven acres of prime Barossa viticulture, the majority of it is old vine material, planted 1893, 1899, 1930 and the 1960s. Weapons of Mass Seduction is best suited to those who prefer the big, savoury styles. A powerful dry red, the essential Australian fusion of Shiraz and Cabernet, WOMS is a rich and complex Barossa wine that's tightly woven within a tapestry of well defined oak. WOMS is only ever produced in years of exceptional quality, it can also be relied upon to age very, very well.
Available in cases of 6
Case of 6
$479.50
The Kaesler family migrated from Silesia and setlled in the Barossa circa 1840s. They cleared the scrub and planted 96 acres of Shiraz, Grenache, Mataro and White Hermitage in 1891 WOMS is an exclusively estate grown effort, mostly Shiraz from vines established in 1961, with a third of Cabernet Sauvignon picked off blocks planted 1970 to 1985. Fruit is vinified in static fermenters and pumped over twice daily. WOMS was pressed then transferred to a selection of mostly new Burgundian oak barriques for completion of malolactic, racked and returned to barrel, regularly topped up and racked again after a year. Matured for a full term of eighteen months before bottling without fining or filtration.
Purple crimson colour. Blackberries, mulberry and canned cherries on the bouquet with hints of charry oak. Black cherries, vanilla, some saddle leather characters appear on the palate. WOMS offers layer upon layer of brooding, briary fruit confronted by stunning oak and thick blocks of chocolatey tannin. The fruit is actually quite solid but repressed by oak and tannin at the moment, fruit will prevail. An elegant, savoury wine.
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Kaesler - a century of tradition based around the Old Vines, nurtured and handled by some of the most caring hands in the Barossa

The Kaesler Vineyards were established in 1893. The family, sprung from Silesian pioneers who came to the Barossa Valley in the 1840s, took up 96 acres in 1891. They cleared the scrub and in 1893 planted out the entire holding with Shiraz, Grenache, Mataro (Mourvedre) and White Hermitage vines.

Kaesler

Some of the gnarled dry-grown Shiraz vines still remain and provide the backbone for the intense wines produced from the sandy loams of this prime viticultural block. In the early sixties, Arthur Kaesler saw no future in dried fruit, and pulled out the fruit trees to replace them with vines, mostly Shiraz and Grenache, still mainly for port. He also planted Mataro, just to have something different, Clare Riesling (Crouchen) and some Semillon.

The Kaeslers did not make their own wine. Traditionally, they sold their grapes to the Seppelts. The exceptional Kaesler wines now being produced had their beginning in 1997 when a young winemaker at Cellarmaster just a few hundred metres away at Dorrien noticed the power and intensity of the fruit. The old vine material was there. Led by 3.7 acres of 1893 Shiraz, more than 70% of the red vines in the vicinity of the vineyard were 40 or more years old. The Shiraz thrived on the sandy loam over clay. The Grenache was on the rockier patches, restricting the crop from this prolific producer.

Today's Kaesler Wines springs from a worldwide search for a property to produce the best possible grapes for red wine. Winemaker Reid Bosward and his co-owners, a group of international wine lovers, searched areas such as the Napa Valley, the south of France, Marlborough, and other parts of Australia before deciding on the Barossa. "No other area can produce the intensity of flavor that we have in the Barossa," says Reid.

Kaesler

The first site that the winelovers acquired comprised 26.3 acres of vines, eight acres of Shiraz, 5-1/2 acres of Grenache, 2-1/2 acres of Mataro, eight acres of Semillon and just over two acres of Cabernet Sauvignon. The inaugural 2000 vintage was difficult throughout the valley. Kaesler made a crush of 19.6 tonnes off the twenty six acres, but it was good stuff. In 2001, they added the crop from the newly acquired neighbouring 28.5 acres, six acres of Shiraz, eight acres of Grenache, six of Semillon, some Riesling, and some fresh plantings of Voignier. This was a variety that Reid had experience with in France as a straight white wine, and as a fascinating blend with Shiraz. The first major decision was to intensify the fruit even further. Growers who send their fruit to outside wineries may tend to keep their tonnages up. Growers who make their own wine can opt to restrict the output to increase the quality. By pruning responsibly and reducing water, Reid has already cut the yield on red wine grapes by nearly 40%. The result is density and exquisite flavour. Baume, the measure of sugar content, is high - allowing wine to be made with up to 15% alcohol.

Why make such powerful wines? "Because we can," Reid explains. "Lean wines are for a lean area. The Barossa allows us to have a high intensity of flavour. Most other places can't do this."

It is part of the partners determination to make great wine and to develop a style that offers a choice. Kaesler is built on providing a difference. The partners do not plan to take Kaesler up to 300,000 cases. The determination is to concentrate on producing excellent wine. The only thread that holds Kaesler together is the production of excellent wine.

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