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Airline pilots make surprisingly good wine. Their appreciation of the sciences, a respect for the weather and a bird's eye view of the land, all invaluable to the winemaker's art. John Ellis would take every opportune weekend away from his regular New York Paris route, to pursue a passion for viticulture. He planted the first commercial Cabernet Merlot vines in the Hamptons and found time between trans atlantic flights to work vintages amongst the Grand Cru vineyards of La Bourgogne. Ellis ultimately made the great lifelong sea change in favour of our land downunder. He settled on a farmstead outside Leongatha, amongst the slow ripening pastures of Gippsland.. Placing pinot amongst the pastures»
Giovanni Tait mastered the family tradition of coopering wine barrels before migrating to Australia in 1957. He took up work in the Barossa and ultimately settled in for a lengthy engagement at B Seppelts and Sons, where he played a significant role in the vinification and maturation of some of the most memorable vintages in Australian viticulture. Tait's boys grew up to be winemakers, their attention to detail and close relationship with the Barossa's finest growers have earned the highest accolades from the international wine industry press. Generously proportioned yet exquisitely balanced, famously praised, perennially by savant Robert Parker as the most.. Bespoke parcels of old vineyard fruit»
Right across the road from Jasper Hill's Emily Paddock,a precious parcel of ancient terra rosa soil was acquired and planted to vine by a baronial Mornington estate, highly accomplished growers with a consuming aspiration to grow the finest Shirazin all Heathcote. They settled on a coveted site along Drummond's Lane, strewn with unique green Cambrian shards, a sacred place to yield the top growth amongst single vineyardHeathcote Shiraz. Decades later, the vintages remain excruciatingly measured in availability. Painstakingly hand made, arcanely labelled behind the monikers, Pressings, Block F and Block C, the cherished editions of Heathcote Estate represent.. The likely lads of drummond's lane»
Right around the time that Frank Potts was planting his nascent Bleasdale Vineyards during the 1850s, an eccentric Prussian named Herman Daenke established a homestead along the banks of Bremer River, which he called Metala. The site was planted to viticulture by Arthur Formby in 1891 and became one of Langhorne Creek's most productive vineyards, it continues to supply fruit for a number of prestigious national brands. Legendary winemaker Brian Dolan took the radical step of bottling Metala under its own label in 1959 and won the inaugural Jimmy Watson Trophy in 1962. Two generations later, the brothers Tom and Guy Adams took a similar leap of faith and.. The goodly farms of brothers in arms»

All Saints Rutherglen Muscat 375ml CONFIRM VINTAGE

Muscat Muscadelle Rutherglen Victoria
This is a great celebration of the vital characters of luscious Muscat. Fashioned from barrels of old stock of various vintages, All Saints has lovely flavours of butterscotch and apricot, fresh lifted spirit, and that sensational aromatic profiles. The long, warm Autumn days at Wahgunyah are virtually perfect for allowing the fruit to ripen to the high baume levels and raisining so essential for the style. Delightful on its own as an after-dinner drink, All Saints is superb when served alongside hot oven fresh, steaming and spicey desserts.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$209.50
The All Saints Estate's pride and joy are the old vineyard blocks of Muscat, planted just after the First World War. These old-timers are picture-postcard vines, weather-beaten and twisted, defying the years to produce fantastic fruit. Grapes are left on the vine to get really ripe; many of them shrivel up to raisins. The fruit is picked and crushed. This macerates for a few hours in order to allow any raisined berries to swell up. It is then pressed and the juice prevented from fermenting by the addition of high-strength neutral alcohol. The wine is allowed to settle for a few days before being racked off to barrel for maturation. The Rutherglen level of the classification is for the youngest wines with only a few years barrel age.
Rich and luscious nose, perfumed aromatics of lovely peach and apricot with hints of lychee and spice. A hint of tangerine peel on the palate, rancio and honeyed almond, sweet wet tobacco and apple, smoke and leather. It's fresh and spicy, alluring and concentrated yet sleek. Creme brûlee flavours and a nice richness, smooth and elegant, lingering on the finish. There is no need to save All Saints for a special occasion as, unlike table wine, an opened bottle will last months before starting to deteriorate. Already done it's own ageing and is quite ready to drink.
All Saints
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All Saints
Established in 1864, All Saints Estate is one of Australia's original wineries, steeped in history and folklore from another era

Established by two enterprising Scots, George Sutherland Smith and John Banks, the castle was built in the 1880s, based on the design of The Castle of May, complete with turrets and tower. The castle is classified by the Historic Buildings Council, along with two other Estate buildings, the former bottling hall, cellar and Chinese Dormitory. The former bottling hall and cellar now houses The Indigo Cheese Co. and the Chinese Dormitory. Built over a hundred years ago, it is the last remaining example of its type.

All Saints

The Great Hall, is the main wine storage area, lined with huge 100-year-old oak casks, filled with rare Tokays and Muscats. Some of these fortified wines are up to 80 years old and will form the base of future blends for years to come. The wines are amongst Australia's, and the world’s greatest, internationally extolled for their richness and lusciousness. All Saints Estate won the first gold medal for Australian wine in 1873 at the London International Exhibition and continues to win trophies and receive rave reviews today.

Great wine comes from the soil and speaks of where it is from. The vineyards are planted gnarled old vines, growing to deep sandy loam soils, and a perfect winegrowing climate. These old-timers are lovingly tended to produce fruit of intensity and balance. The deep sandy-loam soils were carved from the granite of the mountains, then ground, mixed and shaped by the majestic river Murray. Vines planted more than 85 years ago reach deep down for essential minerals and nutrients, drawing out the very essence of the place and concentrating it in each year’s harvest of grapes.

All Saints pride and joy are the very oldest vineyard blocks; the Midflat Shiraz and Old Muscat, both planted just after the First World War. These old-timers are picture-postcard vines, weather-beaten and twisted, defying the years to produce fantastic fruit. With careful nurturing, the winemaking team take aim at bringing the best out of the vineyards, tending the vines that grow the fruit for the Estate and Family Cellar range of wines. With every season comes a round of tasks, from pruning, through shoot positioning and trellis work, to the yearly hurly-burly of vintage.

All Saints

First planted with vines in 1860 by James Scott, the St Leonards site was named after his birthplace in Scotland. The cellars were added in 1874, and by the 1900s the volume reached 200,000 litres annually, most of which was exported. In 1919 St Leonards was acquired by a syndicate of local vignerons, including Will Chambers. The winery remained busy, processing all of the grapes from Seppelts Rutherglen Vineyards between 1924 and 1928, while Seppelts rebuilt their Clydesdale Cellars. St Leonards was redeveloped in 1973 by noted artist, wine buff and descendant of the original surveyor of the Rutherglen township, John Darbyshire. In 1980, the Browns of Milawa, headed by Peter R Brown took up ownership.

Peter R Brown was one of the original Brown Brothers at Milawa. His children all play a role in the ongoing management of that business, in addition to their independent ownership of All Saints Estate and St Leonards Vineyard. All share the vision of producing outstanding premium table wines and Australia’s finest winery experience. They believe that innovation, youthful passion, a healthy respect for traditional winemaking and a talented team of people are the key to delivering that vision. They look forward to meeting you, sharing a glass of wine and learning more about your story.

A visit to Cellar Door provides a complete experience, one that starts well before you enter the imposing gates. From the main road 2.5km of hedge runs along the perimeter of the estate. The entrance is lined by 130 year old Elm Trees which change beautifully with the seasons. Once on foot, you will pass through the stunning landscaped gardens as you make your way to the Castle entrance.

All Saints