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Sandro Mosele is one of Victoria's most accomplished vignerons, his celebrated editions of Kooyong and Port Phillip estates are amongst the most cherished renderings of Burgundy styled Pinot Noir in the nation. Mosele has applied his art to a precious parcel of fruit, picked off a single, modest block of vine, grown to the fully fertile soils of a lamb and beef stud, on the brisk, maritime blown coastals of Gippsland South. This is not Pinot for profit, Walkerville represents an aesthetic appreciation of fruit from the farmer, invigorated by the blessings of providence and consecrations of local livestock. A cornucopia of comely characters, forcemeats and.. The grazier's garden of gippsland»
Somewhere near the Seaview end of McLaren Vale's Chapel Hill Road, a perfunctory passerine perched her pincers astride a pair of power poles and saw herself alit. Down she went amongst the dry grown branches of an old Grenache vineyard, setting the valuable veterans ablaze. The scorched site eventually came to the attention of a winemaking trio, the Messrs Leske, Tynan & Cooke, Masters of Wine and a venerable vintner, all driven by a consuming passion to make greater Grenache. Thistledown vintage very small amounts of the most extraordinary Grenache. Beautifully detailed and conspicuously elegant, their floral bouquets and graceful finish emulate the aromatic.. Polly & the pyre to paradise»
Coonawarra graziers have access to the finest soils for viticulture. Doug Balnaves was born in the very heart of Coonawarra, quite near the sacred cricket pitch at Penola. An accomplished herdsman and shearer, Balnaves took up the challenge of planting vineyards in 1971. Working under the tutelage of legendary Coonawarra winemaker Bill Redman, Balnaves immersed himself in the culture of the vine, ultimately establishing a grande marque of Coonawarra and securing the inaugural presidency of the Coonawarra Vignerons Association. He remains a lifelong member of the Penola Pipe Band. For those who like their wines structured yet satin, powerful yet prettily.. The old sheep shearer's shanty»
Boutique winemaking affords great advantages, every vine can be uniquely husbanded, quality control is maximised, each barrel can be individually sampled and assembled into the perfect cuvee. Engineering types are innately suited to such viticulture. Colin Best embarked upon his sabbatical to the great vineyards of Burgundy's Cote d'Or. He returned to plant Pinot Noir on a craggy half hectare near Lobethal in the Adelaide Hills. An ancient masonry wool mill was outfitted for winemaking and Leabrook Estate was born. This is an aesthetic range of meticulously crafted, limited vintages, fashioned for the aficianado of bespoke, small batch, little vineyard wines... The lobethal libations of leabrook»

Brokenwood McLaren Hunter Beechworth Shiraz CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz McLaren Hunter Beechworth South Australia
A seamless red wine, brimming with the requisite panache of all things Brokenwood, centred around a backbone of intensely flavoured McLaren Vale Shiraz. The winemaking team are always keen to find dedicated growers with superior vineyards who are on the ball about the quality of fruit that's central to the Brokenwood label. A heightened level of complexity is at the core, fashioned to express the character and charm of each vineyard, generously proportioned and layered with ripe, juicy flavours, followed by a satisfyingly savoury, mouthfilling finish.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$215.50
Brokenwood was founded by a trio of Sydney based solicitors, Tony Albert, John Beeston and James Halliday, who together paid a record price of $970 per acre for a precious, ten acre property at the foothills of the Brokenback Ranges. The vineyard's first block, originally planned as a cricket ground for the local community, became planted to some of the country's most precious Shiraz vines. Parcels are vinified in a mix of open and roto red fermenters over the course of several days, a component finishes its ferment in oak. All batches complete malolactic before being treated to an extended maturation in a mix of new and seasoned French and American oak barrels.
Deep red, purple hues. Plenty of dark berry aromas, sweet oak marrying well. Spices and festive pudding characters on the rich, lengthy palate, liqueur cherry flavours and fleshy plum, supported by fine oak. Tannins are soft and ripe, nothing heavy about this wine at all, but it fills the palate, lingering pleasantly and long. Drink now alongside juicy lamb, crackling pork or succulent veal.
Brokenwood
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Brokenwood
Established in 1970, Brokenwood Wines has evolved from a weekend venture for self-professed hobby winemakers into one of Australia's most reputable wine labels

Brokenwood was founded by a trio of Sydney-based solicitors, Tony Albert, John Beeston and James Halliday, who paid a then record price of $970 per acre for a 10-acre block in the foothills of the Brokenback Ranges. The original block - originally planned as a cricket ground for the local community was planted with Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz.

Brokenwood

The first vintage was picked in 1973. It was a labour of love for the partners, and the friends and families they conscripted to help, with the grapes being carried to the winery in buckets in the back seat of Len Evans' Bentley. Brokenwood's inaugural vintage yielded 75 dozen Shiraz - Cabernet. While none of the original partners claimed to know anything about viticulture, the wine received praise, and attracted a loyal following from its first vintage.

In 1975, a new winery was built to accommodate the growing production. The winery housed fermentation tanks and oak barrels, and, in dorm-style accommodation, the exhausted bodies of the many helpers who came to stay at Brokenwood, seduced by the promise of clean country air, fine food, wine and company in exchange for help on the vineyard. Visitors helped themselves to a taste of the very limited and eagerly sought after boutique wine made by Halliday and his band of weekend winemakers from a table standing in the shade of the first floor balcony.

Growth was steady until the boom of 1978, when six new partners joined, allowing the purchase of the next door Graveyard Vineyard. Designated as a cemetery by the local town planners, but never used as such, the block had been planted with Shiraz & Cabernet Sauvignon.

Brokenwood

The heavy clay soil resulted in vintages of low yield, but with extraordinary concentration of flavour in the berries, providing a distinctive wine style that is still evident in the Brokenwood red wines.

The Graveyard Vineyard created Brokenwood's flagship wine, the Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz, which is still sourced exclusively from this one vineyard. The Langtons Classification of Distinguished Australian Wine has it as the highest rated Hunter Valley red wine, in the Outstanding category. In the same year, Brokenwood sourced fruit from outside the Hunter Valley for the first time - Cabernet Sauvignon from Coonawarra - which was blended with Hunter fruit to make a premium red.

In 1982, the company extended its range to include white wines - notably the jewel of the Hunter Valley, Semillon. With this broadened scope, the partners decided to consolidate further growth by appointing a Chief Winemaker/Managing Director. Iain Riggs joined Brokenwood in 1982, introducing new winery equipment and facilities specifically for premium white wine production. Brokenwood was now capable of producing high quality white wine, which, since 1983, has been a significant part of its total production.

The multi-regional blend wines, such as the popular Cricket Pitch range, are sourced from premium regions throughout Australia to create a style that demonstrates balance, elegance and consistency. While the size of the company has grown, the operation remains deliberately labour intensive, being the only way of assuring the individuality of the wines.

Brokenwood