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Constructed during early settlement by a supervisor of colonial convicts, at the very epicentre of the market gardens which serviced Hobart, Clarence House is a heritage listed manor which remains largely unaltered since the 1830s. It passed through several hands before being acquired by the Kilpatricks in 1993, who answered the call of Bacchus and established the grounds to vine. There are now sixteen hectares of viticulture, several significant Burgundy clones of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, with smaller plantings of Sauvignon and Pinot Blanc, Merlot, Cabernet and Tempranillo. What's most unique about the Clarence House vineyards are the soils and topography,.. Heirlooms of a hobart homestead»
There's a vineyard at Moorooduc in upper Mornington, planted to a splendid north facing slope which captures the maximum warmth of sunshine each day. Refreshed after nightfall by the invigorating maritime winds off Bass Strait and Port Phillip Bay, it's a place of exceptional winegrowing. Populated by ten unique Burgundy clones, this very special block of vine grew the only Pinot Noir ever to claim our nation's highest accolade for great red wines, the Jimmy Watson Memorial Trophy. The property continues to yield limited releases of outstanding vintages, it's a place of exacting viticulture and uncompromising pursuit of excellence, cherished by cognoscenti and.. The burgundy clones of mornington»
Airline pilots make surprisingly good wine. Their appreciation of the sciences, a respect for the weather and a bird's eye view of the land, all invaluable to the winemaker's art. John Ellis would take every opportune weekend away from his regular New York Paris route, to pursue a passion for viticulture. He planted the first commercial Cabernet Merlot vines in the Hamptons and found time between trans atlantic flights to work vintages amongst the Grand Cru vineyards of La Bourgogne. Ellis ultimately made the great lifelong sea change in favour of our land downunder. He settled on a farmstead outside Leongatha, amongst the slow ripening pastures of Gippsland.. Placing pinot amongst the pastures»
There are but two winemakers who can lay claim to a staggering four Jimmy Watson Trophy victories. Wolf Blass was the man behind the label. John Glaetzer was the man behind Wolf Blass. While working for Wolf, Glaetzer was moonlighting on his own brand, applying the same extravagance of technique to the pick of Langhorne Creek fruit. Perfection in the form of black bramble fruit, muscular yet affable tannins, all framed by the luxury of ebony oak. Aspirants of the great Black Blass Label fables of 1974, 1975 and 1976, are privately advised to avail themselves of John's Blend, Cabernet or Shiraz. Crafted from the same parcels, in the same way, by the same hands,.. Timeless mystique of langhorne creek»

By Farr Chardonnay CONFIRM VINTAGE

Chardonnay Geelong Victoria
An extremely limited release every year, crafted from grapes picked off the same property which makes the illustrious Sangreal Pinot Noir, a highly mineral site for the growing of Chardonnay in the style of Chablis. By Farr is a profound expression of uniqueness in terroir. A Victorian flagship Chardonnay, exhibiting exquisite balance between fruit freshness and power, texture and minerality. A regimen of lees stirring and full malolactic, further contribute to the understated richness of an immensely engaging white wine.
Available in cases of 6
Case of 6
$449.50
Gary Farr established Chardonnay vines on his house block at Bannockburn in 1994. The quality of fruit, picked off a mix of Dijon clones and Penfolds 58, grown to a northerly slope of rich, friable red loam over limestone soils, clearly shows through in the finished wine. Grapes are all hand picked, inspected for health and whole bunch pressed, solids are collected and chilled before filling to a mix of seasoned and new French oak barrels. A naturally occuring wild fermentation, initiated by ambient wild yeasts, at cooler temperatures is followed by a course of lees stirring and the completion of malolactic. Barrels are racked, fined and lightly filtered for botling, normally at eleven months after vintage.
Light straw green hues. Varietal stonefruit and melon nose, complexed by nutty oak and spice notes. Generously layered palate showing tinned peaches and nectarine, preserved lemon and creamy autolysis. A wine of power and length, framed by toasty, richly textural yet mineral and refined, a seemingly endless finish.
By Farr
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