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Old Richmond Gaol was one of Diemen Land's first prisons, built by the convicts themselves, of good old fashioned granite blocks, laboriously hauled in wooden hand carts and quarried from the ominously monikered Butchers Hill. Today, Butchers Hill is the site of the steepest sloping vineyard in Coal River Valley, invigorated by afternoon sea breezes and prevailing winds from the roaring forties, its highly auspicious, self mulching black Vertosols, yield extraordinary wines. Established by founding members of the Hobart Beefsteak & Burgundy Club, Butchers Hill represents three generations of passion amongst the nether vineyards of the Apple Isle. Not just a.. Princely parcels of pooley»
Kooyong Estate only make limited editions from tiny blocks of vine, a hectare or less, which yield deeply personal wines, highly eloquent of their terroir, aspect and clime. There are the pebbled ironstone soils of Farrago, which create an uncannily Burgundesque style of Chardonnay, redolent of grapefruits, mealy bran and wet flint. The precious half hectare at Faultline articulates the savouryness of seaweed and struck match. The sheltered lee of Haven Block encourages the grapes to bloom with chewy red jube characters. The windswept parcel at Meres infuses wonderfully perfumed rhubarb and ribena notes into a velvetine tannin structure. All are equally.. Venerable vintages from the most precious parcels»
Hoddles Creek was planned and developed from day one, with a view to crafting an artful range of superlative Yarra Valley wines. The most arduous aspects were planted, because they offered the best promise of outstanding quality fruit. Chilly mornings, vivid afternoon sun and extended ripening, profound vintages of intensely ripened berries. From four superior rows of Pinot Noir on the Hoddles Creek property at Gembrook. Rows 22 to 26 always yield something spectacular with each new vintage, the mix of Burgundian and new world clones are hand picked and separately vinified for release as an exquisite limited edition, only made in the finest vintage years... For partisans most particular about pinot»
Torbreck of Barossa are one of Australia's great export brands, synonymous with luxury and excellence throughout the world of wine. Crafted from the fruit of old and ancient vineyards, the opulence and exclusivity of Torbreck's painfully limited production challenge the primacy of Grange. Established by a share cropper in the 1990s, its precious range has risen to the status of First Growth amongst the community of ardent international advocates. Woodcutter is the entry level, assembled from parcels which may have been destined for some of the brand's lofty icons, an essential experience for all enthusiasts of compelling Barossa Shiraz... Chew a chop of woodcutter's wine»

Torbreck The Bothie Frontignac 375ml CONFIRM VINTAGE

Muscat Frontignac Barossa South Australia
On a highland trail, the place to stop and rest when weary is known as a Bothie. Torbreck have been tinkering away at a sweet wine since 2001, the idea was always to construct something that's just a little bit different. This sweeter style of Frontignac exhibits lifted fruit aromatics, lifted perfumes of rosewater and honeydew melon, geraniums and lime, very characteristic of it's Barossa provenance. Bothie is a very versatile wine that can be enjoyed either at the start of a meal or nicely chilled at the end, alongside fresh fruits and cheese, ice creams or sorbet.
Torbreck's owner operator David Powell has always been a huge fan of France's Muscat Beaumes de Venise. Muscat à Petits Grains (Brown Frontignac) grapes are harvested from Helbig Vineyard at Marananga in several stages to acheive different levels of ripeness, creating a myriad of potential flavours. Grapes are gently crushed and pressed with as little skin contact as possible to minimize phenolics. Fruit is treated to a slow vinification in fermenters, halted mid way by the addition of a neutral spirit to arrest yeasts against further acivity and raise alcohol level to around fourteen percent, retaining Brown Frontignac's natural sweetness.
A vibrant, straw/ peach yellow colour. Beautifully fragrant aromas of fresh pine/ lime, melon and lychees are accompanied by extraordinary floral notes. The subtle, clean flavours of lemon sorbet, lemon tart and orange rind balance perfectly with the residual sugar to achieve a full, lush, round palate. A sweet but substantial wine, equally enjoyable as aperitif or dessert.
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Torbreck
Low yielding, old and dry grown Barossa Valley vineyards are the cornerstone of Torbreck Vintners

Torbreck founder David Powell was immersed in the study of Economics at Adelaide University, when an uncle introduced him to wine. Young Dave realized that grapes could be more intriguing than numbers. He began spending more and more of his spare time in the Barossa Valley and during the winters, he availed himself of the opportunity to venture overseas to work harvests in California and Italy. He travelled throughout the famous wine regions of Europe and even spent time in Scotland as a lumberjack. This experience was instrumental in illuminating the unique attributes of the Barossa, at a time when others felt its heritage was past the sell by date.

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Finding work at Rockford, Powell became steeped in the traditional culture of the Barossa as the idea of owning his own winery began to take shape. David was saddened by the vinous devastation caused by the mid 1980s government sponsored ‘Vine Pull’ scheme. He became convinced that a market existed for old vine wines as influenced by the classic Rhône styles. Lacking deep pockets (but inspired nonetheless), he set about approaching local landowners concerning their neglected properties.

Powell began to discover and clean up a few sections of dry grown old vines and was able to secure a contract for the supply of grapes from a run down but ancient Shiraz vineyard. He managed to raise enough money to share farm the vineyard, a practice which involves paying the owner a percentage of the market rate for his grapes in return for totally managing the property. Dave nurtured these old, lifeless and overgrown vineyards in his spare time. Near lifeless, he brought them back to health and was rewarded with small parcels of fruit which he made into wine.

Bringing the old practice of share farming back to the Barossa subsequently secured for him a regular supply of fruit from the best Shiraz, Grenache, and Mataro vineyards, including a few hectares of what are thought to be among the oldest grapevines on the planet. In return for his equity of toil and sweat, Powell’s efforts were rewarded with a few parcels of dry grown fruit, and he turned these wages into the first bottles of Torbreck.

Torbreck

As the first vintages lay in barrel, Dave thought back to his experiences overseas and realized that the growers of the Barossa Valley had overlooked the suitability of the French white Rhône varieties. Powell purchased 30 acres of land in Marananga in 1994 for the purpose of planting Marsanne, Roussanne, and Viognier. Shiraz was included in the mix in what is now known as the Descendant Vineyard, also the site of the new Torbreck winery.

In 1995 Dave crushed three tonnes of grapes and fermented them into wine in a shed on his 12-hectare Marananga property. He named his wine Torbreck after the forest in Scotland where he worked as lumberjack. Other acquisitions (included a one hundred year old vineyard that had been previously share farmed) soon followed, and Torbreck continues to follow the path of sourcing the best fruit possible from its own vineyards and those of select growers. It can be said that the Torbreck portfolio offers the best of both worlds, old and new. Powell is a passionate believer in the Barossa Valley and its viticultural heritage. Dave loves the intense, rich, Rhone-like flavours that come from old vines. His approach to grapegrowing and winemaking melds the region’s terroir with its traditional winemaking practises. In so doing he has achieved a style that fuses his love for the Barossa with his admiration for the valleys of the Rhône.

In July 2002 the historic Hillside property was acquired by Torbreck. Situated in Lyndoch, it is one of the original Barossa properties. Vast and picturesque it contains some magnificent old and ancient vineyards that will further the source of premium quality fruit. The Hillside property contains a wonderful native ecosystem that supports a myriad of flora and fauna which Powell intends to turn it into a nature reserve. An original settlers hut has been lovingly restored as the winery cellar door and provides a personal touch with some Barossa warmth. A new winery and administration facility was completed on land acquired from a next door neighbour. Complete control of all aspects of production have seen a new benchmark of wine quality established by Torbreck in the Barossa.

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